tattoosancient - Tattoos in Ancient Egypt Judith Illes Not...

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Tattoos in Ancient Egypt Judith Illes Not that long ago, in Western industrialized culture, tattooing was associated exclusively with those perceived as "primitive," "marginal" or even "criminal." Sailors and convicts were associated with tattoos as were women of a certain repute and perhaps the occasional nobleman gone slumming. This attitude has changed drastically in the last decade or so. Tattooing has become popular enough among the general population as to seem virtually commonplace. [. . .] As far as we know, the history of tattooing starts in ancient Egypt. The phrase "as far as we know" is key because body ornamentation is an ephemeral art. Skin does not ordinarily survive in the archaeological context, with the exception of certain unique circumstances (the bog people of Northern Europe) or certain unique preservation techniques (the mummies of ancient Egypt). [. . .] However, the earliest documented evidence for the tattoo is in Egypt. [. . .] . The earliest intimations of tattoos come from clay figurines dating to roughly 4000 B.C.E. These female figurines are decorated with dots, dashes and lozenges. This was inconclusive evidence until the discovery and examination of preserved, mummified bodies, whose body designs closely echo the patterns etched on the figurines. Among the best-preserved mummies is that of a woman from Thebes from Dynasty XI
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tattoosancient - Tattoos in Ancient Egypt Judith Illes Not...

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