French 1 Final Review.docx - UNIT 1 Moi je parle fran\u00e7ais(pages 3-4 Comment \u00e7a va How are you Tr\u00e8s bien merci Very well thanks \u00c7a va Fine Pas mal

French 1 Final Review.docx - UNIT 1 Moi je parle...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 27 pages.

UNIT 1 Moi, je parle français (pages 3-4) Comment ça va? Très bien, merci. Ça va. Pas mal. Ça peut aller. Ça ne va pas très bien. How are you? Very well, thanks. Fine. Not bad. I’m getting by. Things aren’t going well. Les pronoms sujets et le verbe être (pages 7-8) - A subject pronoun can be used in place of a noun as the subject of a sentence P1: Alex est de Paris? P2: Non, il est de Bruselles. Alex is from Paris? No, he’s from Brussels - Use tu with a person you know very well; otherwise, use vous . Use vous also when speaking to more than one person, even if they are your friends. Audrey et Fred, vous êtes de Genève? Audrey and Fred, are you from Geneva? - On is an indefinite pronoun that can mean one, they, or people, depending on the context. On is often used instead of nous to mean we. On always takes to singular form, est. Nous, on est de Lillie. We are from Lillie. - Elles refers to more than one female person or to a group of feminine nouns. Ils refers to more than one male person or to a group of masculine nouns, or to a group that includes both males and females or both masculine and feminine nouns. Anne et Sophie, ells sont en forme Jean-Luc et Rémi, ils sont stressés Anne and Sophie are fine. Jean-Luc and Rémi are stressed out. Julie et Damien, ils sont occupés Julie and Damien are busy - Use a form of the verb être in descriptions or to indicate a state of being. Elle est occupée Tu es malade? Je suis stressé She’s busy. Are you sick? I’m stressed out.
- The final -t of est and sont is usually pronounced before a word beginning with a vowel sound. Il est en forme. Il est malade. Elles sont en forme. Elles sont stresses. He’s fine. He’s sick. They’re fine. They’re stressed out. - Use c’est and ce sont to identify people and things: C’est Madame Dupont? C’est un ami, Kevin. Ce sont M. et Mme Lafarges. That’s Madame Dupont? This is a friend, Kevin. This is Mr. and Mrs. Lafarges. La salle de classe (page 13) une affiche une brosse une carte une calculatrice une chaise une craie une fenêtre une gomme une porte une règle une télé(vision) un bureau un cahier un CD un crayon un DVD un feutre un lecteur CD un lecteur DVD un livre un ordinateur un stylo un tableau des devoirs (m.) poster eraser (for board) map calculator chair piece of chalk window eraser (for pencil) door ruler television desk notebook CD, compact disk Pencil DVD Felt-tipped marker CD player DVD player Book Computer Pen Board Homework Sons et lettres (pages 16-17) - L’accent aigu is used with e and is represented by é - L’accent grave is used with e and is represented by è - L’accent circonflexe can be used with a,e,I,o,u and is represented by ê - Le tréma indicates that vowel letters in a group are pronounced individually: ï - La cédille indicated that c is to be pronounced as s rather than k before the vowel letters a, o, or u: ç.
Les phrases pour la salle de classe (Le professeur dit/ les étudiants répondent page 14) - Le professeur dit: Écoutez bien, s’il vous plait! Régardez le tableau! Level-vous!

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture