memory_day_2(instructor) - DEMONSTRATION 1 This exercise...

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DEMONSTRATION 1 This exercise illustrates that (1) students do not need to try to remember in order for things to get in memory, and (2) thinking about meaning is much more effective for getting material into memory than thinking about other aspects of the content. What to tell your students: Please get out a blank piece of paper and number the lines from 1 to 30, so that you have 30 places to put answers. [Wait until they have completed this task. To save time, you can distribute sheets with numbered lines.] I’m going to read aloud 30 words and for each word you just have to perform one of three tasks. Each task is really simple. The first is called spoken to the left . If I turn my head to the left like this [demonstrate] when I say the word, then you should write “y” on your paper for “yes.” But if I keep my head looking straight at the class, then you should write “n” for “no.” So for example, I might say, “Spoken to the left? [Turn your head to the left as you say the next word.] Shell.” And you would write “y” on your paper. Okay? The second task is called A or U . If I say “A or U?” you should write “y” for “yes” if the following word has either an A or a U in it. So if I say, “A or U? Doctor.” You would write “n” for “no.” The third task is called rate for pleasantness . For that one, I want you to listen to the word I say, and think of whether it makes you think of pleasant things or unpleasant things. Then write a number from 1 to 7 showing how pleasant the word is. A 1 means it’s really unpleasant—for example, the word “injury” might get a 1. Write a 7 if it’s really pleasant—for example, “birthday.” Use numbers between 1 and 7 for medium pleasantness. You have to listen carefully because there are three tasks, and I’m going to mix them up. I’ll tell you right before each word which task you should do for that word. Let’s try a couple of each for practice; you don’t need to write your answers for these. A or U? Save Spoken to the left? [Keep your head straight.] Worth Rate for pleasantness: Coin Rate for pleasantness: Tiny A or U? Moral Spoken to the left? [Turn your head to the left.] Upper Any questions? What to do: Read each item and then pause for students to answer, which should only take a moment. 1. Spoken to the left? [Keep your head straight.] Hundred 2. Rate for pleasantness: Corn 3. A or U? Cool 4. Spoken to the left? [Keep your head straight.] Rate 5. A or U? Jump 6. Spoken to the left? [Turn your head to the left.] Place 7. Rate for pleasantness: Urge 8. A or U? Country 9. Spoken to the left? [Turn your head to the left.] Entirely 10. A or U? About
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11. Rate for pleasantness: Diamond 12. Spoken to the left? [Keep your head straight.] Into 13. Rate for pleasantness: Welcome 14. A or U? Window 15. Spoken to the left? [Turn your head to the left.] Hold 16. Rate for pleasantness: Airplane
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2011 for the course LEARNING L 110 taught by Professor Afrancis during the Spring '11 term at Community College of Philadelphia.

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memory_day_2(instructor) - DEMONSTRATION 1 This exercise...

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