Ch14_Outline - Chapter14 WeatherPatternsand SevereWeather...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
 Chapter 14  Weather Patterns and  Severe Weather
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Characteristics    Large body of air 1600 km (1000 mi) or more across  Perhaps several kilometers thick Similar temperature at any given  altitude  Similar moisture at any given altitude  Move and affect a large portion of a  continent 
Background image of page 2
    A Cold  Canadian  Air Mass  Figure 14.2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Source region —The area where an  air mass acquires its properties Classification of an air mass Two criteria are used to classify air  masses  By the latitude of the source region  Polar (P)   High latitudes Cold
Background image of page 4
    Air Masses  Classification of an air mass Two criteria are used to classify air  masses   By the latitude of the source region   Tropical (T)   Low latitudes Warm By the nature of the surface in the source  region   Continental (c)   Form over land  Likely to be dry
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Classification of an air mass By the nature of the surface in the  source region   Maritime (m)    Form over water  Humid air  Four basic types of air masses  Continental polar (cP)  Continental tropical (cT) Maritime polar (mP) Maritime tropical (mT)
Background image of page 6
    Figure 14.3 Air Masses  and  Source  Regions
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Air masses and weather cP   and  mT   air masses are the most  important air masses in North America,  especially east of the Rockies   North America (east of the Rocky  Mountains) Continental polar (cP)   From northern Canada and interior of  Alaska  Winter—Brings cold, dry air  Summer—Brings cool relief 
Background image of page 8
    Air Masses  Air masses and weather North America (east of the Rocky  Mountains) Continental polar (cP)   Responsible for  lake-effect snows   cP air mass crosses the Great Lakes   Air picks up moisture from the lakes  Snow occurs on the leeward shores  of the lakes
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Air masses and weather North America (east of the Rocky  Mountains) Maritime tropical (mT)   From the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic  Ocean Warm, moist, unstable air  Brings precipitation to the eastern  United States 
Background image of page 10
    Air Masses  Air masses and weather North America (east of the Rocky  Mountains) Continental tropical (cT)   Southwest and Mexico  Hot, dry Seldom important outside the source  region 
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Air Masses  Air masses and weather Maritime polar (mP) Brings precipitation to the western 
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course EAS 120 taught by Professor Svec during the Fall '08 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

Page1 / 49

Ch14_Outline - Chapter14 WeatherPatternsand SevereWeather...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online