mcb140-sp10-mt2-Roelink-soln

mcb140-sp10-mt2-Roelink-soln - Name: ID#: MCB140: Second...

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Name: ID#: 1 MCB140: Second Midterm Spring 2010 Before you start, print your name and student identification number (S.I.D) at the top of each page. There are 11 pages including this page. You will have 150 minutes for the 150-point exam. The value of each question is given at the beginning of the question. Place your answer on the front of the page. Only answers in that space will be graded. You may write in pencil; however, to preserve your rights to a regrade, you must write your answers in pen. You are welcome to use the textbook, notes and a calculator. Wireless devices of any sort are not permitted. Good luck! ______________________________________________________ This section is for grading. Do not write here. 1(20 [6, 7, 7])_______ 2(25)_______ 3(25)_______ 4(15)_______ 5(20)_______ 6(20)_______ 7(25)_______ EXAM SCORE: __________
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Name: ID#: 2 Question 1 (A) 6 points. Look at this pedigree What is the likely inheritance pattern? X-linked recessive Indicate in the pedigree the people who are for sure are carriers (heterozygotes but healthy) of the disease allele. (B) 7 points. Look at this pedigree of two extended families. The affected members are deaf. What is the inheritance pattern? Recessive autosomal Are there members who carry a disease allele? If so, who are they? Explain why two deaf people can have offspring who have normal hearing The mutations do complement (different genes) (C) 8 points. Look at this pedigree Explain this inheritance pattern. Maternal Dominant What is the most likely cause of this disease? A mutation in mitochondrial DNA x x x
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Name: ID#: 3 Question 2 You decide to study the adenine biosynthetic pathway in budding yeast. You mutagenize haploid yeast cells and then select for cells that grow well on complete medium but fail to grow on medium lacking adenine, using replica-plating techniques. Several mutants are found. When grown on plates with a small amount of adenine, you notice that some mutants grow in colonies that are red, while others form white colonies. Crossing the mutants show that they fall into one of two complementation groups, A and B. (A) forms red colonies and (B) forms normal whites colonies on limiting adenine. Both complementation groups are recessive to wild type. That is, all heterozygous diploids (one mutant allele and one wild type allele) can grow and form white colonies in the absence of adenine. Next, you determine if the genes are linked. The mutant genes are designated a and b , and the wild type genes are designated A and B . You perform the following cross: a B x A b Remember, both a B as well as A b cannot grow without adenine. a B colonies are red A b colonies are white when a little adenine is around. You expect that a b cells will not be able to grow on adenine, but you don’t yet know whether they’ll turn red. The phenotypes of the 60 haploid spore colonies resulting from 15 tetrads ( a B cells crossed with A b cells) are shown in the table below. In this table, “+” means able to grow in the absence of adenine,
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mcb140-sp10-mt2-Roelink-soln - Name: ID#: MCB140: Second...

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