CJS 200 - The Effects of Punishment and Sentencing

CJS 200 - The Effects of Punishment and Sentencing - 1 The...

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The Effects of Punishment and Sentencing University of Phoenix August 2, 2009 1
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Sentencing is the last process in the criminal justice process. The sentence (punishment) given to defendants can be in between the lines of probation or death. The defendant’s punishment is decided upon by either the judge or the jury. There are four basic philosophy reasons for sentencing. These can be described as retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation. One of the oldest justifications is retribution. Retribution justice is a philosophy that believes anyone committing a criminal act shall be punished based on the crime committed and its severity. In this justice, no other parts of the crime are considered when punishment is given. Looking into the approach that is the opposed would lead us to deterrence. Deterrence justice is used in belief that the criminal will think out the benefits and the costs of committing the crime. It is believed that criminal acts can be prevented by using punishment as a threat. With that being said, when punishments are given, all punishments would be rigorous. Another form of punishment is incapacitation. Incapacitation uses incarceration as the justification.
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CJS 200 - The Effects of Punishment and Sentencing - 1 The...

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