lecture23 - Power plant electrical components Generators...

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ENGRI 1290 1 Power plant electrical components Generators Transformers PV panels
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ENGRI 1290 2 Generator principle As we saw in electromagnetic principles, electrical currents can be generated inside a coil rotating inside a magnetic field. Rotating magnetic fields can also generate currents inside immobile coils. The magnetic field is created by currents flowing inside the rotating coil called rotor. The rotation comes from mechanical work. The electrical energy is generated by the rotation of the rotor, not by the magnetic field. Almost all the rotational energy is turned into electrical currents (efficiency ~ 95 %) in the stationary coil, called stator. B Since most of the power comes for the stator coils it is more practical to have these coils fixed instead of moving when dealing with high power systems.
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ENGRI 1290 3 Three phase generators I t B B B 60º Three phase are used world-wide for electrical power since it carries the smaller amount of current for equivalent power. To obtain three phase in a generator, three coils are used instead of one. Each coil is separated with the next one by 60°. There is free space between the coils. Can we pack more coils inside the generator ?
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ENGRI 1290 4 Three-pole three phase generators Three identical generators Flip the field in one Rotate one by 65 Rotate one by 130 Since there is still space left we can add 3, 6, 9, 12, … more poles
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ENGRI 1290 5 Three phase generator power 1 PV I 3 P3 V I While P 1 or P 3 are in watts it is customary to use kVA (kilo volt ampere) for AC electrical power.
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course ENGRI 1290 taught by Professor Gourdain during the Fall '10 term at Cornell.

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lecture23 - Power plant electrical components Generators...

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