Fall2001 - 1 The imaginary points on the celestial sphere...

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1 The imaginary points on the celestial sphere which are at opposite ends of the Earth's rotation axis are the (1) celestial poles 2 The imaginary half-circle running from the north point on the horizon through the zenith to the south point is the (1) local celestial meridian 3 At the Earth's equator, the daily (diurnal) motion causes the stars to appear to (1) rise and set vertically 4 The point where the Sun crosses the celestial equator moving from north to south is the (1) autumnal equinox 5 The approximate date of the winter solstice is (1) Dec. 22 6 The Sun rises farthest to the south of east on the (1) winter solstice 7 The equatorial coordinate that is measured in hours, minutes, and seconds east of the vernal equinox along the celestial equator is (1) right ascension 8 The heliacal rising of a particular star, e.g. Sirius, recurs at intervals of a (1) sidereal year 9 The Moon's phase when it is a quarter-circle (6 hours) east of the Sun and conspicuous in the western evening sky until midnight is (1) first quarter 10 The Moon goes from major standstill to minor standstill over a time interval equal to (1) half the regression period (approximately 9.3 yr) 11 The Moon's northern minor standstill direction is where
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Fall2001 - 1 The imaginary points on the celestial sphere...

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