Fall2001VER - 1 The imaginary points on the celestial...

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1 The imaginary points on the celestial sphere which are at opposite ends of the Earth's rotation axis are the (1) celestial poles 4 The point where the Sun crosses the celestial equator moving from north to south is the (1) autumnal equinox 5 The approximate date of the winter solstice is (1) Dec. 22 6 The Sun rises farthest to the south of east on the (1) winter solstice 8 The heliacal rising of a particular star, e.g. Sirius, recurs at intervals of a (1) sidereal year 9 The Moon's phase when it is a quarter-circle (6 hours) east of the Sun and conspicuous in the western evening sky until midnight is (1) first quarter 11 The Moon's northern minor standstill direction is where (1) its rising point swings out the smallest distance north of east during the month 12 The time interval for the Moon to go through its complete cycle of phases is termed the (1) synodic month 13 The following features or alignments were all proposed by Gerald Hawkins in his book Stonehenge Decoded . Which is the most controversial? (1) the Aubrey Holes were used to predict eclipses
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course AFA 2000 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '11 term at Alaska Pacific University.

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Fall2001VER - 1 The imaginary points on the celestial...

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