Fall2002 - 1 The imaginary circle midway between the...

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1 The imaginary circle midway between the celestial poles on the celestial sphere is the (1) celestial equator 2 The altitude of the celestial pole equals (1) the observer's latitude 3 The Sun passes through the vernal equinox on approximately (1) March 21 4 The Sun sets farthest to the north of west on the day of the (1) summer solstice 5 The equatorial coordinate that is measured eastwards along the celestial equator is (1) right ascension 6 The time interval during which the Sun goes from the vernal equinox all the way around the ecliptic and back to the vernal equinox is termed the (1) tropical year 7 The term heliacal rising refers to (1) a star or planet's first appearance in the dawn sky after having been hidden by the Sun's glare 8 The Moon's phase between full and third or last quarter is (1) waning gibbous 9 Because of the directions of motion of the Moon and its nodes relative to the stars the nodical month is (1) shorter than the sidereal month (2) longer than the sidereal month (3) the same length as the sidereal month (4) NVA (5) NVA 10 The Moon's major standstills occur when the ascending node is
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course AFA 2000 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '11 term at Alaska Pacific University.

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Fall2002 - 1 The imaginary circle midway between the...

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