Jacque's paper

Jacque's paper - Running Head EFFECTS OF AUDITORY STIMUL I...

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Running Head: EFFECTS OF AUDITORY STIMULI DELIVERY ON MEMORY 1 Effects of Auditory Stimuli on Memory Jacque Randall Arizona State University
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EFFECTS OF AUDITORY STIMLUI DELIVERY ON MEMORY 2 Effects of Auditory Stimuli Delivery on Memory Often in everyday life, people encounter new technology. Most of these advancements can prove to be useful and helpful. Consequently, it is of importance to investigate which of these technological advances are helpful, and which are hurtful to progress with daily undertakings. It is known that the more sensory information received, the more difficult it is to perform cognitive tasks. We are curious about the effect of auditory stimuli delivered through headphones on short-term memory. Furnham and Allass (1999) found that background music while taking cognitive tests has been beneficial to some; and detrimental to others. Additional research conducted by Freeburne and Fleischer (1952) revealed listening to music can also have an effect reading comprehension. We would like to further these studies to observe the effects of listening to music through headphones in comparison to open speakers, and to silence on participants’ efficiency on memory tests. By researching this topic further, we can advise the public if they should continue to use auditory stimuli through headphones while attempting to retain information, or if it is best to discontinue this activity. If there is a considerable
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EFFECTS OF AUDITORY STIMLUI DELIVERY ON MEMORY 3 improvement when listening to music through headphones, we can propose the idea of allowing students to listen to music through headphones while doing work or taking exams in class. There are similar studies performed in the past observing the effects of listening to classical music while participants studied, or comparing the affects of lyrical music to instrumental music such as research by Crust et al (2004). Most college students choose to listen to their personal music devices while they study and do homework. We want to know if this habit is helping them focus and retain the information, or if it is a distraction when trying to work. We have also decided to use modern music instead of classical music, in hopes of creating a life-like example; as it is rare for college students to listen to classical or instrumental music. Isbell (2007) found that most college students listen to pop music. A comparable study by Goel (1984) looked at music as a distracter while grad students performed tests found music to impair their ability to retain information. Our research will be different in that we would like to see if there is any significance in the ways of receiving the auditory stimuli, and how well participants
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2011 for the course PSY 290 taught by Professor Cate during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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Jacque's paper - Running Head EFFECTS OF AUDITORY STIMUL I...

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