HST 109 discussion 2

HST 109 discussion 2 - Jon Brinkman HST 109 Disc 2 1....

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Jon Brinkman HST 109 Disc 2 1. According to Webster, who benefits from industrialization and how does he reason thus? Does Crockett’s tour report support Webster’s claims? In Webster’s excerpt, the author describes how industrialization will help the entire country. In his argument, Webster states that by using science to help production, every part of the economy can be helped out. Through producing more products, more employees will need to be hired. In addition, since so many products can be made, then they also need to be cheap and affordable for anyone. This way, the consumer can pay a fair price, and the producer still receives profit. He also adds a side statement, noting how England will also be indebted to the United States. Overall, Webster encourages America to embrace the scientific knowledge, and expand business in order to help the entire nation (Webster 1). When Crockett visited the North, he was slightly confused at first, since he was not used to the bustling cities. Still, even Crockett stated that these industries were very important for the country; furthermore adding, that the employment of men and women not only adds to individual happiness, but also to the wealth of our nation. He also agrees with Webster with the idea that the industrialization decreases America’s dependency on foreign nations (Crockett 1). 2. From the National Trades’ Union Convention and Robinson readings, do you think either the Convention or Lowell girls would agree with Webster that opposition between workers and factory owners/managers was a “specious fallacy”—that the interests of both sides were the same? When reading these two articles, it is clear that the Lowell girls would agree with Webster in regards to the factory and owners opposition. In the National Trades’ Union Convention article, the author clearly objects the opposition of the workers. This is mostly because of the women working (Commons 1). Yet, when reading the Lowell article, the exact opposite is true. This article expresses no problem at all between the two groups, and how the author in particular is very grateful for the experience. This is much more close with the Webster article, and therefore I would say that the Lowell girls would agree with Webster (Robinson 1). 3.
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HST 109 discussion 2 - Jon Brinkman HST 109 Disc 2 1....

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