Forensic_Drug_Testing_1

Forensic_Drug_Testing_1 - Forensic Drug Testing Part 1:...

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Forensic Drug Testing Part 1: Screening Roger L. Bertholf, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Pathology Chief of Clinical Chemistry & Toxicology
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What is forensic drug testing? MDs order drug tests to evaluate the medical condition of a patient Medical drug testing, or Clinical Toxicology Employers order drug tests to determine whether someone uses illegal drugs Drug testing for legal purposes, or Forensic Drug Testing
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Medical vs. forensic drug testing Patient consent not required Identity of specimen is presumed Screening result is sufficient for medical decision Results are used for medical evaluation Subject must consent to be tested Identity of specimen must be proved Only confirmed results can be considered positive Results are used for legal action
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Illegal Drug Use in the U.S. (1998 Household Survey) 13.6 million Americans use illicit drugs 25 million in 1979 8.3% of youths age 12-17 use marijuana 14.2% in 1979 1.8 million Americans use cocaine 5.7 million in 1985
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Types of drugs used Marijuana and some other drug 21% Drug other than marijuana 19% Marijuana only 60%
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Types of drugs used 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Percent using in previous 30 days All drugs THC PsyRx Cocaine LSD, etc. Inhalants
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History of workplace drug testing 1960s – 1970s: The Department of Defense begins testing military personnel for illegal drug use. 1986: President Reagan establishes the “Federal Drug-Free Workplace”. 1988: Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs is published in the Federal Register.
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The “NIDA” program NIDA (now SAMHSA) requirements for drug testing were drafted by Research Triangle Institute The RTI established the National Laboratory Certification Program (NLCP) Drug testing for federal agencies (DOT, NRC, etc.) must be performed in a NLCP- certified laboratory
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The Florida HRS (now AHCA) established a drug-free workplace program in 1990 Specifications for the State of Florida program are similar to federal requirements, but there are notable differences
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Forensic_Drug_Testing_1 - Forensic Drug Testing Part 1:...

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