ASE 162M - Ballistics Range Instructions

ASE 162M - Ballistics Range Instructions - ASE 162M...

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ASE 162M Instructions on the Use of the Ballistics Range by Michael Tsurikov Spring 2001
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2 I. Introduction The ASE 162M ballistics range is used to study the characteristics of high-subsonic and supersonic flow over blunt bodies. The range uses standard .22 caliber rifle bullets and is equipped with sensors that permit the calculation of the bullet's speed. It also contains a shadowgraph setup that provides an image of the flowfield around the bullet. A typical shadowgraph photo of a .22 caliber bullet traveling at supersonic speed is shown in Figure 1 below. The photo clearly shows the shock waves generated by the bullet, as well as the turbulent wake behind the bullet. Figure 1. Shadowgraph of a bullet flying in the ballistics range at supersonic speeds. The ballistics range is shown in Figure 2. It consists of two large iron pipes, about 10 inches in diameter, welded together in a cross shape. The bullet is fired from a rifle mounted in the front of the range. While in flight, the bullet passes through two infrared optical sensors that are used to measure the bullet's speed. It then passes the second iron pipe, which is used to produce the shadowgraph photos. A flash lamp mounted at the end of the second pipe illuminates the bullet, and the shadowgraph photo is captured on a Polaroid camera. Finally, the bullet is brought to rest in a sand-filled backstop. The control deck contains the electronics needed to run the experiment. All these components are discussed below.
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3 Rifle mount Motion sensors Flash lamp Control deck Camera Backstop Figure 2. The ballistics range. III. The optical sensors The optical sensors are mounted on a printed circuit board as shown in Figure 3. The bullet passes through the circular opening of the sensor. The black housing contains an infrared light-emitting diode and an infrared detector. The LED is pointed at a reflective surface on the other side of the opening, and the light is received by the detector. When the bullet passes through the opening, it blocks the reflected light. The sensor then sends a pulse to the electronics control deck that the bullet has passed. Information from the two sensors is used to compute the time of flight. Figure 3.
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course ASE 162M taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at University of Texas.

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ASE 162M - Ballistics Range Instructions - ASE 162M...

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