ASE 102 - Practice Final 2

ASE 102 - Practice Final 2 - Introduction to Aersosgace...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Aersosgace Engineering ASE 102 Final Examination December 12, 2002 NAME: 1. Please indicate whether the following statements are true or false: (15) (1) Sir George Cayley invented thejet engine. (1) (2) A satellite in an orbit around the Earth at an altitude of 200 miles takes about a week to make one revolution around the Earth. (1) (3) The ailerons of an aircraft control the roll of the vehicle. (1) (4) The exhaust velocity of a rocket engine depends on the square root of the temperature in the combustion chamber of the rocket. (l) (5) Werner von Braun Was the first person to derive the rocket equation. (1) (6) The specific impulse of a rocket motor depends on the square of the exhaust velocity of the rocket. (l) (7) A helium filled balloon can reach a higher altitude than an identical balloon ‘ filled with hydrogen. (1) (8) Living microbial life forms were discovered on Mars by the Viking spacecraft in 1976. (1) (9) The asteroid Belt lies between the planets Mars and Jupiter. (1) (10) Robert Goddard was the first to launch a successful liquid fueled rocket in 1926. (1) (l 1) An airplane is stable if the center of gravity of the airplane is located to the left of the center of lift. (1) (12) The range of an airplane depends on the lift to drag ratio of the aircraft. (1) (13) A supersonic aircraft must have high aspect ratio wings to reach high speeds. (1) (14) The orbital velocity of a satellite in Earth orbit depends on the mass of the satellite. (1) (15) The lift of an aircraft wing depends on the square of the velocity of the aircraft. (1) ll. Calculate the orbital speed of a satellite in a circular geosynchronous orbit located above the Earth’s equator. (15) III. A nuclear reactor can be used to heat helium gas to drive a rocket. The reactor can operate at a temperature of 30000 K which is the same as the temperature of the combustion chamber of a conventional rocket. The nuclear and conventional rocket both eject the same amount of exhaust gas per second. The thrust of each rocket is determined by the exhaust velocity multiplied by the rate at which mass is ejected by the rocket. Compare the thrust of the nuclear rocket with one that burns hydrogen and oxygen. (15) IV. A helium filled balloon is flying at an altitude of 8,000 feet carrying a payload of 74,000 pounds with 30,000 pounds of ballast. The balloon is approaching a mountain range with a ridge at 14,000 feet. Assume that the temperature of the air is 300° K at all altitudes. The balloon weighs 50,000 pounds and it has a radius of 100 feet. Assume that the balloon is spherical and that the density of the air at ground level is 0.0625 pounds/cubic foot. Can the balloon Clear the ridge? (15) V. A Rockwell B—lB aircraft is on a mission to bomb a target 2500 miles from its base. The aircraft carries 200,000 pounds of fuel fully loaded. The wings of the airplane can be swept and in the fully extended position, the aspect ratio of the wings is 10 and in the swept back position its 2. With the wings extended, the aircraft burns 10,000 lbs/hour of the fuel. In supersonic flight with the wings swept, the fuel consumption rate is 80,000 lbs/hour. The mission plan calls for a fully subsonic mission with extended wings so that the airplane can conduct the mission flying at subsonic Speed. Assume that the airplane stays at the same altitude and at the same speed during the entire flight. (20) (a) How long does it take the airplane [to conduct the planned mission? (5) (b) Five hundred miles out from the target, the B-lB is attacked and the pilot switches to supersonic flight to evade. the attackers. The pilot sweeps the wings back and flies to the target at supersonic speed and back to the point where the attack occurred 500 miles from the target. At what speed does the airplane fly on this segment of the flight? (10) (c) At the SOD—mile point, the pilot extends the wings again for the flight back to base. Does he have enough fuel to get back without calling for support from tanker aircraft? (5) VI. Charles Lindbergh ew across the Atlantic in 1927 from New York to Paris, a distance of about 6000 km. The trip took about thirty hours. The dry mass of the “Spirit of St. Louis” was 4000 and the lift to drag ratio was about 15. Assume that the constant in the Breguet equation, k/eg, is equal to 1000 km. - (a) How much fuel did the airplane bum making the trip? (10) (b) What fuel reserve did Lindbergh have to carry if the assumed that there would be a head wind of 50 km/hour for the last 1000 km of the trip? (10) ...
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