E 316K - Powerpoint Review

E 316K - Powerpoint Review - Richard Price (1723-1791) A...

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Richard Price (1723-1791) A Discourse on the Love of Our Country (1789) Let us, in particular, take care not to forget the principles of the Revolution . . . : First: The right to liberty of conscience in religious matters. Secondly: The right to resist power when abused. And, Thirdly: The right to chuse our own governors; to cashier them for misconduct; and to frame a government for ourselves. Tremble all ye oppressors of the world! Take warning all ye supporters of slavish governments, and slavish hierarchies! Call no more (absurdly and wickedly) REFORMATION, innovation. You cannot now hold the world in darkness. Struggle no longer against increasing light and liberality. Restore to mankind their rights; and consent to the correction of abuses, before they and you are destroyed together. Edmund Burke (1729-1797) Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) On the scheme of this barbarous philosophy, which is the offspring of cold hearts and muddy understandings, and which is as void of solid wisdom, as it is destitute of all taste and elegance, laws are to supported only by their own terrors, and by the concern, which each individual may find in them, from his own private speculations, or can spare to them from his own private interests. In the groves of their academy, at the end of every visto, you see nothing but the gallows. Nothing is left which engages the affections on the part of the commonwealth. On the principles of this mechanic philosophy, our institutions can never be embodied, if I may use the expression, in persons; so as to create in us love, veneration, admiration, or attachment. But that sort of reason which banishes the affections is incapable of filling their place. These public affections, combined with manners, are required sometimes as supplements, sometimes as correctives, always as aids to law. . . . There ought to be a system of manners in every nation which a well-formed mind would be disposed to relish. To make us love our country, our country ought to be lovely. Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) A Vindication of the Rights of Men (1790) But on what principle Mr. Burke could defend American independence, I cannot conceive; for the whole tenor of his plausible arguments settles slavery on an everlasting foundation. Allowing his servile reverence for antiquity, and prudent attention to self-interest, to have the force which he insists on, the slave trade ought never to be abolished; and, because our ignorant forefathers, not understanding the native dignity of man, sanctioned a traffic that outrages
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every suggestion of reason and religion, we are to submit to the inhuman custom, and term an atrocious insult to humanity the love of our country, and a proper submission to the laws by which our property is secured.--Security of property! Behold, in a few words, the definition of English liberty. And to this selfish principle every nobler one is sacrificed. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792)
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course E 316K taught by Professor Berry during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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E 316K - Powerpoint Review - Richard Price (1723-1791) A...

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