ASE 362K - Lecture Handout - Wing Condensation

ASE 362K - Lecture Handout - Wing Condensation - Mach...

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Visualization by Condensation of Water Vapor Water vapor condenses into a fog when it is cooled to a sufficiently low temperature. The presence of such a fog over an aircraft indicates that such cooling has taken place. Here a fog appears over the wings/fuselage during takeoff (note the landing gear is still down). Isentopic cooling of the air takes place as it accelerates over the aircraft. This shows it does not take transonic flow (or “shock waves”) to form a condensation fog. The “flying clouds” that are observed on transonic aircraft are a manifestation of the Prandtl-Glauert Singularity, i.e., the extreme cooling that occurs as the flow accelerates over the wings and fuselage. The start of the condensation is in a low-temperature expansion region where the flow has the highest
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Unformatted text preview: Mach number. Shock waves can be visualized by this phenomenon, but it is where the fog disappears abruptly at the aft end of the aircraft. This is because the flow temperature increases across a shock and evaporates the fog. Commercial airplane. The condensation is due to cooling of flow as it accelerates over the wings with flaps down. It is not due to P-G singularity. B-2. Also, not transonic. Transonic F/A-18 Hornet. Condensation due to the Prandtl-Glauert Singularity. Simulation of a supercritical airfoil M =0.8, =4 trailing edge shock Low-pressure / low-temperature zone (note how it is swept back)...
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course ASE 362K taught by Professor Dolling,d during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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ASE 362K - Lecture Handout - Wing Condensation - Mach...

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