Lecture30 - Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates Most...

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Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates Most carbohydrates consumed by ruminants are polymers of glucose present in the form of cellulose or starch. In addition, large amounts of hemicellulose and pectin may also be present in some diets. Because these components are polysaccharides, they must undergo hydrolysis in the rumen prior to fermentation. The following four bacterial species are the most common amylolytic bacteria in the rumen. These bacteria hydrolyze starch to maltose and glucose. Once starch is degraded to maltose it is fermented rapidly by saccharolytic microbes. Bacteroides amylophilus Streptococcus bovis Succinimonas amylolytica Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens
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Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates Starch Digestion Starch α Amylase Dextrins α Amylase Maltose Glucose Maltase β Amylase
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Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates The major saccharolytic bacteria are: Bacteroides ruminicola Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens Selenomonas ruminantium The saccharolytic bacteria ferment glucose and other monosaccharides mainly by the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. Conversion of glucose to 2 moles of pyruvate yields 2 ATP. This ATP is the primary source of energy for growth and maintenance of bacteria.
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Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates Conversion of Cellulose to Glucose Cellulose exists in two forms
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This note was uploaded on 09/19/2011 for the course ANS 5446 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture30 - Microbial Fermentation of Carbohydrates Most...

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