Session 1 Psych 202 - Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for...

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Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for Psychology 202 Session 1 Materials Topics: Personality. Social Psychology. The Cognitive Perspective of Personality. Values according to G. Allport: Value Behavior Occupation Social Helping People Social work Theoretical Searching for truth Education Economic Pragmatic activities Business Aesthetic Artistic activities Arts, performance Religious Search for harmony Clergy Political Power and influence Politics Locus of Control: A stable set of expectations about the relationship between (a) various events and the individual’s actions and (b) the sources of these events and actions. External Locus of Control The individual tends to believe that most events are caused by external forces over which this person has little or no control (luck or misfortune, for example) Internal Locus of Control The individual tends to believe that most events are caused by people‟s own efforts (luck and misfortunes are, in general, preventable)
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Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for Psychology 202 Personality Traits according to R. Cattell (developed by P.Costa and R. McCrae) Extraversion Introversion Talkative, passionate, active, and dominant Quiet, unfeeling, and passive Agreeableness Unfriendliness Good-natured, soft-hearted, and trusting Irritable, ruthless, and suspicious Neuroticism Emotional Stability Worrying, vulnerable, anxious Calm, hardy, self-controlled, satisfied Openness Dogmatism Creative, imaginative, and variety- seeking Uncreative, down-to-earth, and routine- seeking Conscientiousness Irresponsibility Hardworking, attentive, ambitious, and responsible Negligent, lazy, aimless, and irresponsible
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Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for Psychology 202 Applied Studies: Not only stupid people act foolishly: Smart people can act foolishly by virtue of their thinking they are too smart to do so. Such people tend to act foolishly through the commission of one or more of five cognitive fallacies: Unrealistic optimism : they believe that they are so smart that they can do whatever they want and not worry about it Egocentrism: they focus on themselves and what benefits them while discounting or even totally ignoring their responsibilities to others Omniscience : they believe they know everything, instead of knowing what they don‟t know Omnipotence : they believe they can do anything they want because they are all-powerful Invulnerability: they believe that they will get away with whatever they do, no matter how inappropriate or irresponsible it may be. The antidote to foolishness is wisdom: people are wise to the extent they apply their skills, intelligence, and creativity toward a common good by balancing their own interests, the interests of others, and the potential risks. Source: PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved Authors: Sternberg, Robert J. Yale University, New Haven, CT, US Original publication: European Psychologist. 9(3), Sep 2004, 145-150.
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Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for Psychology 202 Personality types from the Clinical Perspective.
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This note was uploaded on 09/15/2011 for the course ECON 301 taught by Professor Asdf during the Spring '09 term at Northern Virginia Community College.

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Session 1 Psych 202 - Prepared by Dr. Eric Shiraev for...

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