BIO203_Muscle_NMJ

BIO203_Muscle_NMJ - A.M Gordon et al J Physiol 184 170-192...

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1 A.M. Gordon et al ., J. Physiol. 184: 170-192, 1966, Fig. 14 A.M. Gordon et al ., J. Physiol. 184: 170-192, 1966; Fig. 12 Eckert Animal Physiology , Fig. 10-8b,c; cf . Sherwood, Klandorf & Yancey, Animal Physiology: From Genes to Organisms , Figure 8-18 Eckert Animal Physiology , Fig. 10-8d
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2 Isometric vs . Isotonic Contraction • In isometric contraction , a muscle generates force but does not shorten. • In isotonic contraction , a muscle generates constant force and shortens. A muscle shortens fastest when it is unloaded. As the load increases, the velocity of shortening decreases, until at high loads the muscle cannot shorten at all (isometric contraction). Sherwood, Klandorf & Yancey, Animal Physiology: From Genes to Organisms , Figure 4-20 Motor Unit motor nerve motor endplate/neuromuscular junction Vertebrate Neuromuscular Physiology • Functional nerve-muscle group: – composed of motor units – motor unit = neuron + muscle fiber(s) • Coupled events: – nerve action potential
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BIO203_Muscle_NMJ - A.M Gordon et al J Physiol 184 170-192...

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