Lecture7-3notes

Lecture7-3notes - 10/14/10 Table 12-2 Locomotion 11/11/2009...

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10/14/10 1 Locomotion 11/11/2009 Table 12-2 1. Consider Table 12-2 in your textbook, p. 540. a. Based on those data, if a typical mammal like a human excretes 1.3 liter of urine a day, what volume does the glomerulus Flter per day? Most of the volume of any physiological solution is water. HW comment G±R = urine ²ow x C urine /C plasma G±R= 39.6 ml hr -1 b. How much water was reabsorbed in the tubules per hour? Use Table 12-2? No, not a mammal. State 2/3. Because 2/3 of water is absorbed by the proximal tubule? But this is the whole kidney UNDERSTAND what is going on HW comment UNDERSTAND what is going on Urine ²ow is 0.6 ml hr -1 G±R= 39.6 ml hr -1 What happens to volume that is Fltered but not excreted?
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10/14/10 2 HW comment c. In the same chicken (i.e., with the same GFR and urine excretion rate), Na + concentration in the blood is 160 mM. Na + concentration in the urine is 230 mM … . If Na + is neither secreted nor absorbed, what would its concentration in the urine be? Already know from part a that for inulin, which is neither secreted nor absorbed C urine /C plasma = 330 mM/5 mM = 66. What should C urine /C plasma for Na + be, if it is neither secreted nor absorbed? HW comment Already know from part a that for inulin, which is neither secreted nor absorbed C urine /C plasma = 330 mM/5 mM = 66. What should C
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2011 for the course BIO 203 taught by Professor Loretz during the Fall '09 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Lecture7-3notes - 10/14/10 Table 12-2 Locomotion 11/11/2009...

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