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ECSE424 Final Exam - Winter 2006

ECSE424 Final Exam - Winter 2006 - McGill University...

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Unformatted text preview: McGill University Faculty of Engineering FINAL EXAMINATION Winter 2006 (April ’06) HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION ECSE 304—424B and 304—683B April 25, 2006 14:00 Examiner: Jo my Cooperstock Associate Exarni er: Ta! Arb Signature W Signature (J 4 Student name: McGill I.D. number: INSTRUCTIONS: This is a CLOSED BOOK examination. Write your answers directly on the examination pages in the space provided. You are permitted REGULAR AND TRANSLATION dictionaries. FACULTY STANDARD CALCULATOR permitted ONLY. This examination consists 0f 12 questions on a total of 6 pages, including this cover sheet. Please ensure that you have a complete examination paper BEFORE starting. This examination is printed on BOTH SIDES of the paper. All questions are worth equal marks. N0 rodents were harmed in the preparation of this examination. 1. COnsider two different ways of selecting a. word of text using the mouse: (a) sweeping the mouse over the word while the mouse button is depressed (b) double-clicking the mouse button when the mouse is over any part of the word Buxton’s terminology of sub-tasks (eg. move mouse to start of word, click, move mouse to end of word, release) would suggest that these two approaches require 4 and 5 sub-tasks respectively, yet method (b) seems much more efficient. Describe two reasons for this. 2. The cursor is presently at the center coordinate (x = 800, y 2 600) of a large, 1600 x 1200 screen. You will place a single-pixel target on the screen that the user must point to exactly, using the mouse. List the five pixel locations for this target that the user can access the fastest and explain your answer. 3. Engelbarts’s mouse had 3 buttons, the Xerox Star mouse had 2, and the (original) Apple mouse 1. What are the tradeoffs between different numbers of mouse buttons? 4. The Apple “Mighty Mouse”, pictured below, represents a departure from the company’s previous insistence on a single—button mouse. This unit’s shell is touch—sensitive and detects where the user is clicking, thereby providing a means for distinguishing between a virtual left and right mouse button. Two force—sensing side buttons are also provided for activation of special functions. In addition, rather than offering a traditional vertical scroll wheel, this mouse includes a small scroll ball (trackball) that allows the user to scroll in 360° for suitably enabled applications, while a piezo speaker emits subtle sounds during operation. (a) What is the main potential drawback of this design for the left and right mouse buttons? (b) Rekimoto defines computer—augmented interaction as that in which users interact with a real world augmented by the computer’s synthetic information. Why is the synthesis of audio by the Mighty Mouse not an effective example of this interaction paradigm? (c) What user interface paradigms are supported by this mouse? 5. When used in its typical context, the mouse is grasped and manipulated to control the position of a cursor on screen. Fitzmaurice defines Graspable User Interfaces (from which Tangible User Interface emerged) as those that allow direct control of electronic objects through physical artifacts. Why does Fitzmaurice exclude the mouse as an example of this paradigm? 6. Visualization (on a 2D display) of volumetric (3D) data, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) output, is often difficult to control and navigate with a mouse. (a) Describe an interface seen in class that provides the user with an intuitive mechanism for se— lecting the specific display plane the user wishes to see. (b) What interface paradigm does this system employ? 7. Computerized musical instruments must account for interaction requirements that are substantially different from conventional human-computer interfaces. (a) Why is the WIMP paradigm inadequate as an interface for such instruments? (b) One of the designer’s concerns is that the performer develops an adequate mental model of the instrument, allowing it be learned and played. Using HCI terminology (from Norman) list the three most significant factors over which the designer has control and explain how each relates to the performer’s mental model for the instrument. 8. One of the many failings of the Therac—25 was the operator interface. (a) In What respect was the interface not designed for safety? (b) Describe this problem with respect to operation of the Therac—25 and user behaviour. 9. Ubiquitous Computing (Ubicomp) is based on the principle of invisibility. Since the distraction of computer interfaces is the root of the problem that Ubicomp hopes to address, how can this goal be achieved by adding more computers to the environment? 10. Reactive Environments are based on the premise that an appropriately designed system should be able to infer users’ intentions and react appropriately in a context-sensitive manner. What design principles are suggested inorder to achieve usability? Provide an example illustrating how each is achieved in the Reactive (videoconferencing) Room. 11. You’ve been hired to lead the development of a new web—based transportation planner for customers of the Société de Transport de Montréal (STM). The system specifications state that the user must be able to select an origin and destination, specify the desired time of travel, and obtain a set of route options. Your boss has told you that there’s not a lot of time to complete the project, so he wants to you to get started immediately on coding a functional prototype, basing the design on his favourite map navigation interface. a Ex lain wh this is a poor approach from an economic erspective. P y p (b) What, instead, should be your first task? (c) What development activities should take place before you begin coding the functional prototype? 12. With increasing computer power and improved codecs, conventional videoconferencing systems are able to deliver an impressive quality of video, even with limited available bandwidth. (a) With regard to their support of audio, in what respects are conventional videoconferencing systems limited? (b) A large screen allows videoconferencing participants to be displayed in life—size, which is an important factor in how people perceive each other. Assuming both the camera and display offer extremely high resolution, what problem arises as the screen size increases? (0) What technique has been used (experimentally) to overcome this problem? ...
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