Class 4 - Class 4 The textbook doesnt emphasize that it...

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Class 4 The textbook doesn’t emphasize that it needs to be complete Bit (binary digit): Either true/false, up/down, 0/1, yes/no, etc. It is the smallest possible amount of info Byte (usually 8 Bits). There are 256 possibilities of stories a character with a 8 bit byte An example of our record is storing a quiz grade EBCDIC v ASCII There is no mathematical procedure of converting a letter to a number using binary To solve this problem we use convention- we just make it up Binary Coded Decimal: 6 bit code, then changed it to an 8 bit code to make an extended binary coded decimal Extended Binary Code Decimal Interchange Code: What IBM created to enable computers to exchange information All of IBM’s competitors came up with American Standard Code for Information Interchange (7 bit code). There were two ways different ways of coding each letter.
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course SAS 101 taught by Professor Unsure during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Class 4 - Class 4 The textbook doesnt emphasize that it...

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