homework2

Homework2 - Homework Set 2 Due Wednesday 07/06 Problem 1 A wave on a string has an amplitude of 1.5cm a period of 0.12 seconds and a wavelength of

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Homework Set 2 Due Wednesday, 07/06 Problem 1 A wave on a string has an amplitude of 1.5cm, a period of 0.12 seconds, and a wavelength of 1.1 meters. a. What is the wave's frequency, angular frequency, wave number and wave speed? b. If the string is under tension of 5.0N, what is its mass per unit length, in grams per meter? c. If the tension in the string changes to 10.0N but the frequency of the wave remains the same, what is its new wavelength? Problem 2 A string with mass per unit length μ = 10.0g/m is tied down on one side, and runs over a pulley on the other side, 0.30 meters away. The end that runs over the pulley is attached to a 1.5 kilogram mass. Assume that the end of the string that is tied down and the point that runs over the pulley cannot move, but the piece between these points is free to oscillate. a. What is the string's fundamental frequency? b. Now this system is placed in an accelerating elevator. The 3rd harmonic frequency is measured to be 204 hz. Is the elevator accelerating up or down? What is its acceleration?
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Problem 3 Two strings with different masses per unit length are connected together and held at a tension of 50 N : An wave with an amplitude of 2.50cm and a frequency of 60.0 hz is incident from the
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This note was uploaded on 09/19/2011 for the course PHYS 1C taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '07 term at UCSD.

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Homework2 - Homework Set 2 Due Wednesday 07/06 Problem 1 A wave on a string has an amplitude of 1.5cm a period of 0.12 seconds and a wavelength of

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