Lesson 3 DOD - Slide 1 © 2001 By Default! Organization...

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Unformatted text preview: Slide 1 © 2001 By Default! Organization & Mission of Organization the DOD the LT Lozeau Intro to NS Fall 2010 A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 2 © 2001 By Default! LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student will know the current organization and missions of the Department of Defense, and the relationship of this organization to the Armed Forces, the National Security Council, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and unified and specified commands. The student will know the major missions of the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Coast Guard. The student will know the major organizational components of the U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Coast Guard. The student will know the mission and organization of the U.S. Merchant Marine as an element of national defense preparedness. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 3 © 2001 By Default! LEARNING OBJECTIVES The student will comprehend the role of commissioned officers as members of the U.S. Armed Forces and know the obligations and responsibilities assumed by taking the oath of officer, accepting a commission, and the constitutional requirement for civilian control. The student will comprehend the concept of command and control as an exercise of authority and direction by a properly designated commander over assigned forces in the accomplishment of a mission. The student will know the concepts of naval command and control within the Armed Forces. The student will know the chain of operational command from the National Command Authority to the platform commander. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 4 © 2001 By Default! Department Of Defense A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 5 © 2001 By Default! We are America’s ... Oldest company Largest company Busiest company Most successful Most company company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 6 © 2001 By Default! How we evolved 1775 1775 1775 1798 1798 War Department (1789) 1947 Dept. of the Army Department of the Navy (1798) Dept. of the AF SecDef position created Nat’l Mil Estab DoD created (1949) Dept. of Defense America’s oldest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 7 © 2001 By Default! 5.3 million strong 1.4 million active 1.4 duty duty 654,000 civilians 1.2 million Guard 1.2 and Reserve and 2.0 million retirees 2.0 & families receiving benefits receiving America’s largest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 8 © 2001 By Default! Our global infrastructure Operates from more Operates than 6,000 locations than Using more than 30 Using million acres million More than 600,000 More buildings and structures structures America’s largest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 9 © 2001 By Default! Worldwide presence More than 146 countries Some 473,881 personnel overseas or afloat America’s largest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 10 © 2001 By Default! In comparison ... Company DoD Budget/ Revenue* Employees* $371 billion 2,036,000 Wal-Mart 227 billion 1,383,000 ExxonMobil 200 billion 97,900 GM 181 billion 365,000 Ford 160 billion America’s largest company 354,400 A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 11 © 2001 By Default! We hire the best High school diplomas Masters degrees Most successful company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Forces Forces 95% 5.6% Work Force* 79% 4.9% Slide 12 © 2001 By Default! We instill values Duty Integrity Ethics Ethics Honor Honor Courage Loyalty Most successful company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 13 © 2001 By Default! Every month we ... Cut 5 million paychecks Take 920,000 contract or purchase actions Fit 50,000 pairs of boots Serve 3.4 million meals America’s busiest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 14 © 2001 By Default! On any given day we ... Buy enough fuel to drive car around world 13,000 times Maintain 12,000 miles of waterways Operate 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity Manage 225 high schools and elementary schools Provide day care for more than 200,000 children America’s busiest company A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 15 © 2001 By Default! BREAKDOWN A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 16 A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk © 2001 By Default! Slide 17 © 2001 By Default! CHAIN OF COMMAND Types: Administrative and Operational – Administrative • Recruit, organize, supply, equip, train, service, mobilize, demobilize, Recruit, administer, and maintain the forces of our four military services. administer, • Includes: – The Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. – The Chiefs of Staff of the Army and Airforce, the Chief of Naval Operations The and the Commandant of the Marine Corps. and • Not directly involved in the employment of combatant forces. – Operational • Responsible for the employment of forces provided by the administrative Responsible chain of command chain • Carry out missions in support of national defense. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 18 © 2001 By Default! ADMINISTRATIVE CHAIN OF ADMINISTRATIVE COMMAND COMMAND A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 19 © 2001 By Default! ADMINISTRATIVE CHAIN OF ADMINISTRATIVE COMMAND COMMAND Commander in Chief SECDEF SECNAV CNO CINCPACFLT COMNAVSURFPAC CRUDES GROUP CRUDES SQUADRON USS Redhawk A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 20 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL CHAIN OF OPERATIONAL COMMAND COMMAND A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 21 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL COMMANDS A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 22 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL CHAIN OF COMMAND Commander in Chief SECDEF CINCPAC C7F CTF-70 CTG-70.1 CTU-70.1.5 (USS Redhawk) A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 23 © 2001 By Default! How we’re organized National • President Command • Secretary of Defense Authority Office of the Secretary of Defense Military Departments Chairman of the JCS • Plan & • Train & equip coordinate Unified Commands • Conduct operations • Organization A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 24 A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk © 2001 By Default! Slide 25 © 2001 By Default! DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE The DOD is the successor agency to the National Military Establishment created by the National Security Act of 1947. It was established as an executive department of the government by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949, with the Secretary of Defense as its head. There are three primary provisions of the amendments. – The establishment of three military departments (Army, Navy and Air Force) under the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF). – The organization of each military department under its own Secretary. – The establishment of unified and specified commands. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 26 © 2001 By Default! DEPARMENT OF DEFENSE The intent of the National Security Act and amendments were to: – Increase civilian control of Armed Forces to be consistent with the constitutional requirements of maintaining civilian control of the U.S. Armed Forces. – Eliminate unnecessary duplication. – Provide more efficient inter-service cooperation. – Provide a unified strategic direction of the Armed Forces. Missions of the DOD: – Support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies. – Protect the United States, its possessions, and areas vital to its interests. – Advance the policies and interests of the United States. – Safeguard the internal security of the United States. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 27 © 2001 By Default! THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE The Office of Secretary of Defense was created by the National Security Act of 1947 as the successor to the Secretary of War. The SECDEF is the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense policy and policy related to all matters of direct and primary concern to DOD. The SECDEF is a member of the President's Cabinet and the National Security Council (NSC), which advises the President about the integration of domestic, foreign, and military policies relating to national security. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 28 © 2001 By Default! THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE The Honorable Robert M. Gates A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 29 © 2001 By Default! THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF The JCS was established informally in WWII and was modeled after the British Chiefs of Staff. Under the National Security Act of 1947, the JCS was created as a permanent agency. The Chairman of the JCS is appointed by the President from the Army, Navy or Air Force and is the principal military advisor to the President, NSC, and SECDEF. He/she is the senior military advisor in the country, but may not exercise military command over the JCS or any of the armed services. The JCS consists of the Chairman, Vice-Chairman, the Chiefs of Staff of Army and Air Force, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Marine Corps. The members of the JCS, other than the Chairman, are military advisors who may provide additional information upon request of the President, the NSC, or SECDEF. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 30 © 2001 By Default! THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF Chairman Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen Admiral A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Vice Chairman General James E. Cartwright Slide 31 © 2001 By Default! THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF Air Force Chief of Staff Air General Norton A. Schwartz General Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey, Jr. Casey, Chief of Naval Operations Chief Commandant of the Marine Corps Marine Admiral Gary Roughead General James T. General Conway Conway A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 32 © 2001 By Default! UNIFIED AND SPECIFIED UNIFIED COMMANDS COMMANDS Effective use of U.S. military power requires joint effort of all land, naval and air forces. The National Security Act stated that each military department and service must coordinate to fulfill certain specific combat functions and for administering and supporting these forces. Unified and specified commands provide the ability to combine forces effectively. A unified command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission and is normally organized on a geographic basis. A specified command also has a broad and continuing mission, but is organized on a functional basis and is normally made up of forces from a single service. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 33 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE COMMANDS COMMANDS Operational commands – Used for direction of actual combatant forces. – Consist of task groups, task forces, etc. – Normally change as one deploys. Administrative commands – Provide support for the operational forces. – Normally located in CONUS, because they provide athome support. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 34 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY MISSIONS US The United States Army today is a force projection Army.” The primary mission is to prepare land forces for war, to fight our country’s wars and win. Today’s Army is unlike that of the Cold War era. The Army then was forward-based. Today’s is essentially CONUS-based and relies on the services of the Navy and Air Force to transport and project the Army into the theater of operation. There are three phases or elements in an Army operation: – Mobilization (Active and Reserve units). – Deployment (utilizing other services as necessary). – Operational. Depending on the definition of war, military operations may or may not be involved in confrontation and conflict. This is known as OperationsOther-Than-War (OOTW). (Examples: disaster relief, fighting forest fires, drug interdiction, etc.) A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 35 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY FUNCTIONS Organize, train, and equip forces for land-combat operations designed to defeat enemy land forces, seize and occupy land areas. Provide air defense units to defend friendly territory from air attack. Coordinate for joint amphibious operations with other services. Conduct special operations. Develop doctrines, procedures, and plans in conjunction with other services engaged in airborne operations. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 36 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY FUNCTIONS Train and provide occupational forces and establishment of military government. Provide humanitarian relief during national disasters. Assist civilian communities during disturbances. Assist with civic action programs. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 37 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL US COMPONENTS COMPONENTS Basic branches and purposes – Infantry: Leads infantry soldiers and employs combined-arms teams in combat. – Armor: Leads armored forces and employs combined-arms teams in close combat. – Field artillery: Provides fire support to ground forces. – Air defense artillery: Employs air defense artillery weapons against enemy aircraft or missile attack. – Aviation: Participates in the entire spectrum of Army missions (i.e., combat, combat support, and combat service support). A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 38 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL US COMPONENTS COMPONENTS Basic branches and purposes – Special Forces: Accomplishes missions of unconventional warfare, foreign internal defense, direct action, strategic reconnaissance, and counter terrorism. – Corps of Engineers: Leads engineer soldiers in combat and combat support operations and carries out construction management and facilities engineering in the field. – Signal Corps: Plans and manages communication systems from combat units to the nation's defense communications system. – Military Police Corps: Supports combat operations, enforcement of laws and regulations, security of government property, criminal investigative operations, and the discharging of correctional functions. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 39 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL US COMPONENTS COMPONENTS Basic branches and purposes – Military Intelligence -- Plans, conducts, and supervises collection, analysis, production, and dissemination of finished intelligence products. – Civil Affairs -- Commands, controls, and coordinates civil military operations and civil administration. – Adjutant General Corps -- Manages the Army's administrative and personnel needs. – Finance Corps -- Responsible for management of the Army's financial resources. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 40 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL US COMPONENTS COMPONENTS Basic branches and purposes – Chemical Corps -- Responsible for operations, training, scientific development, and acquisition in support of nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) defense programs. – Ordnance Corps -- Maintenance and life-cycle management of armament, conventional and special munitions, test equipment, management of air-defense and land-combat missile systems and construction material. – Quartermaster Corps -- Plans and directs all phases of the acquisition cycle along with preservation of all equipment and supplies. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 41 © 2001 By Default! US ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL US COMPONENTS COMPONENTS Special branches – Judge Advocate General Corps – Chaplain Corps – Medical Corps – Dental Corps – Veterinary Corps (only service to have DVMs) – Nurse Corps – Medical Specialist Corps -- Dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists. – Medical Service Corps -- Administrative, technical, and scientific support for medical department. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 42 © 2001 By Default! DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION Secretary of the Army -- Appointed civilian; responsible for all affairs affecting the Department of the Army. Staffs – Office of the Chief of Staff -- Principle military advisor to the Secretary of the Army and is charged by him with the planning, development, and execution of the Army program. – General Staff -- Responsible for operations and plans, personnel, and logistics. – Special Staff -- Provide individuals to the specialty branches, including Corps of Engineers, Chaplains, Medical and Dental Corps, Judge Advocate General Corps, military intelligence, etc. • Army Reserve -- Provides combat service support. • National Guard -- Provides combat supplement. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 43 © 2001 By Default! ORGANIZATION OF TACTICAL ORGANIZATION ARMY UNITS ARMY Squads: Smallest components; range from 4 to 10 individuals. Platoons: 2 or more squads; led by Lieutenants. Companies: 2 or more platoons, usually of the same type; limited capacity for self-support; led by Captains. Battalions: 2 or more company-sized units and a headquarters; generally organized by branch with the addition of administrative and logistical support; led by Lieutenant Colonels. Brigades: 2 or more battalions; can be part of a higher divisional structure of separate units; led by Colonels or Brigadier Generals. Divisions -- 8 to 11 maneuver battalions, 3 to 4 field artillery battalions and an entire range of combat support and combat service support equipment and personnel; infantry, armored, mechanized infantry, airborne, air assault, and light infantry units will be present. Corps -- Largest tactical unit; plans and conducts major operations and battles. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 44 © 2001 By Default! US AIR FORCE MISSION Department of the Air Force was established Department in 1947 by the National Security Act which severed the Air Force from the Army. severed The mission of the Air Force is to defend the The united States through the control and exploitation of air and space. exploitation A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 45 © 2001 By Default! US AIRFORCE FUNCTIONS Strategic aerospace offense Strategic – The objective is to neutralize or destroy an enemy's war-sustaining The capabilities or will to fight. – Attacks directed against an enemy's key military, political, and economic Attacks power base. Strategic aerospace defense Strategic – The objectives are to integrate aerospace warning, control, and intercept The forces to detect, identify, and destroy enemy forces attacking our nation's war-sustaining capabilities or will to fight. – Strategic aerospace defense forces provide warning and assessment of Strategic strategic attack to the National Command Authority through extensive network or warning sensors, both on the earth's surface and throughout aerospace. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 46 © 2001 By Default! US AIR FORCE FUNCTIONS Counter air Counter – The objectives are to gain control of the aerospace environment. The – Offensive counter air (OCA) -- Aerospace operations conducted to seek out Offensive and neutralize or destroy enemy aerospace forces at a time and place of our choosing. – Suppression of enemy air defense (SEAD) -- Aerospace operations which Suppression neutralize, destroy, or temporarily degrade enemy air defensive systems in a specific area by physical and/or electronic attack. – Defensive counter air (DCA) -- Aerospace operations conducted to detect, Defensive identify, intercept, and destroy enemy aerospace forces that are attempting to attack friendly forces or penetrate friendly airspace. Air interdiction (AI). Air – The objectives are to delay, disrupt, divert, or destroy an enemy's military The potential before it can be brought to bear effectively against friendly forces. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 47 © 2001 By Default! US AIR FORCE FUNCTIONS Close-air support (CAS) Close-air – The objectives are to support ground operations by attacking hostile targets in close The proximity to friendly ground forces. – Requires detailed coordination and integration with the fire and maneuver plans of Requires friendly surface forces. Special operations Special – The objectives are to influence the accomplishment of strategic or tactical objectives, The normally through the conduct of low visibility, covert or clandestine military operations. – Usually conducted in enemy-controlled or politically sensitive areas. Usually Airlift Airlift – The objectives are to deploy, employ, and sustain military forces through The transportation of men, equipment, and supplies in the air. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 48 © 2001 By Default! US AIR FORCE FUNCTIONS Aerospace surveillance and reconnaissance Aerospace – The objectives are to collect information from airborne, The orbital, and surface-based sensors. – Surveillance operations collect information continuously Surveillance from aerospace, surface and subsurface sources. – Reconnaissance operations are directed toward localized Reconnaissance or specific targets. Aerospace maritime operations – The objectives are to neutralize or destroy enemy naval The forces and to protect friendly naval forces and shipping. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 49 © 2001 By Default! US AIR FORCE HIERARCHIAL US STRUCTURE STRUCTURE Major Commands Numbered Air Forces Operational Commands Wings Groups Squadron A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 50 © 2001 By Default! Reserve vs National Guard The reserves and National Guard make up about 45 percent of the The military's total manpower and are divided into seven branches: The seven The Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard each have their own dedicated reserve force. Then there is the Air National Guard and Army National Guard. National The Army and other reserves are always under the president's control. The Not so with National Guard units. Though the federal government picks up much of the bill, both Air Force and Army National Guard units are assigned to and primarily controlled by states, which actually gives them greater freedom on the home front. The Posse Comitatus Act makes it Posse illegal for troops to enforce civilian laws but doesn't apply to soldiers serving states. Governors can and frequently do call up National Guard troops to serve as kind of adjunct police (as, for instance, when National Guardsmen are asked to enforce curfews after hurricanes). Guardsmen A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 51 © 2001 By Default! Reserve vs National Guard National Guard units can be federalized by the president should he National declare a national emergency, as President Bush did with a partial mobilization after 9/11. The president has relied on that same partial emergency declaration to keep National Guard units available for Iraq. When such an order is given, the part-timers, who normally train one weekend a month and two additional weeks per year, can be called to duty for two-year stints, a timeframe the Army is now considering lengthening. (Soldiers usually don't serve anywhere near considering (Soldiers that long when working for governors.) The federal government can go one step further: A full mobilization can happen if Congress declares a full national emergency. If such a situation occurs, soldiers can be required to serve for "length of the emergency plus six months." to A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 52 © 2001 By Default! Chain of Command A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 53 © 2001 By Default! Hawaii Chain of Command VP-9 Skipper – CDR 05 – In charge of having the squadron ready for In deployment, all day to day operations deployment, Commander Patrol Wing 2 – CAPT 06 – Overseas all training for three squadrons in Overseas Hawaii, monitors all training for safety and proficiency proficiency Command Task Group – Admiral 07 – In charge of all Wings (Hawaii, Jacksonville, In Whidbey Island) Making sure all Wings maintain their qualifications and training pipelines their A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 54 © 2001 By Default! Bahrain A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 55 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL COMMANDS A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 56 © 2001 By Default! VP-9 Operational Chain of VP-9 Command Command Squadron – still has Skipper 05 – Deployment is heavy flying and less training. Large Deployment focus on safety and excelling at mission focus Command Task Force 57 – CAPT 06 – Organizes all MPRA A/C. In charge of any squadrons Organizes that deploys to CENTCOM. Organizes fuel, parts, training opportunities, air space issues, etc. training Commander, US Naval Forces Central Command Commander, – Vice Admiral Mark Fox is Commander, U.S. Naval Vice Forces Central Command; Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Forces Maritime Component Commander and A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 57 © 2001 By Default! US COAST GUARD MISSIONS New role under the Department of Homeland Security. One facet of the sweeping changes President George W. Bush made post September 11, 2001, was to realign the operational control of the U.S. Coast Guard under the newly created cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security. Prior to this change, the USCG fell under the Department of Transportation during peacetime and the Department of Defense during wartime. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 58 © 2001 By Default! US COAST GUARD MISSIONS Enforcement of all maritime laws and treaties. Search and rescue operations (SAR). Enforcement of national anti-drug policy. Installation, maintenance, upkeep, servicing, and operation of all aids to navigation, including navigation lights, channel markers, and navigational sound-signaling devices. Ice-breaking operations to maintain clear passage in domestic waters for all commercial and military traffic. Support of scientific research projects in the Arctic and Antarctic. Readiness to fulfill any military function as directed. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 59 © 2001 By Default! US COAST GUARD MISSIONS Environmental cleanup and control. Boating safety in domestic and inland lakes and waterways. In wartime, provision of military reconnaissance. Safeguarding of ports and harbors against destruction from sabotage. Investigation of any marine disaster in domestic waters. Instruction to the general public concerning all aspects of water and small boat safety. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 60 © 2001 By Default! US MERCHANT MARINE Importance/Mission: The role of the Merchant Marine in defense is to augment overseas lifting capabilities of the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps for personnel, equipment and stores. At the same time, it continues its normal role of transporting the material needed to support the national economies of the U.S. and its allies. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 61 © 2001 By Default! US MERCHANT MARINE Organization – The Maritime Administration (MARAD), a unit of the Department of Transportation since 1981, is a civilian organization that regulates the U.S. shipping industry and maintains shipping reserves for the government in peacetime. – In time of war or national emergency, MARAD is modified to staff the National Shipping Authority, providing positive control over the nation's shipping assets in order to ensure maximum efficiency in support of vital military and economic priorities. This is known as civil direction of shipping (CDS). – In wartime, ships needed by DOD for sealift are obtained from government-maintained shipping reserves or contracted from private companies to the Military Sealift Command (MSC). Other shipping assets remain under private operation subject to government direction. – All U.S.-controlled merchant ships not under direct jurisdiction of the DOD are still subject to naval control of shipping (NSC), which allows the Navy to provide the most effective possible protection for merchant ships. – MARAD administers the officer training program at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and provides financial support to state maritime academies. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 62 © 2001 By Default! Chain of Command going to be on test Commander-in-Chief: Hon. Barack H. Obama Secretary of Defense: Hon. Robert M. Gates Secretary of the Navy: Hon. Ray Mabus CNO: ADM Gary Roughead CNO: ADM NETC (Naval Education Training Command): NETC (Naval RADM Joseph F. Kilkenny NSTC (Naval Service Training Command): NSTC (Naval RADM Clifford S. Sharpe Sharpe Commanding Officer: CAPT Dan Dixson A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 63 © 2001 By Default! Iran Hostage Scenario A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 64 © 2001 By Default! Iran Hostage Scenario 52 US Citizens taken Hostage for 444 days 52 from Nov 4, 1979 to Jan 20, 1981 from Group of Islamist students took over the US Group Embassy to show support for the Iranian Revolution Revolution On April 23, 1980 a rescue mission was On attempted and failed attempted A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 65 © 2001 By Default! Iran Hostage Scenario With much attention being paid to the With hostages, all military branches wanted to participate with the rescue mission participate Mission was planned poorly with all services Mission playing a part playing Mission was not though out or executed Mission properly properly Showed large gap in inter service operations A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 66 © 2001 By Default! Rescue Mission Failure: Rescue Operation Eagle Claw Operation 8 RH-53D Helicopters (from USS Nimitz), 6 RH-53D C-130 transport and refueling A/C, and 93 Delta Force Commandoes Delta 8 RH-53D flew first day and set up a landing RH-53D strip in desert for C-130 strip Plan was to refuel, move to another staging Plan area, then fly to Tehran area, A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 67 © 2001 By Default! Operation Eagle Claw cont. Of the 8 helicopters that left the USS Nimitz Of one returned to the ship (avionics issues) and one was left in the desert after reporting a rotor blade crack rotor With 6 remaining helicopter, where going to With proceed with the mission until another helicopter had avionics problems helicopter After mission was aborted a helicopter After repositioning itself crashed into a C-130 and killed 8 service members and injured several more more A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 68 © 2001 By Default! Organizational Situation Now A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 69 © 2001 By Default! OPERATIONAL COMMANDS A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 70 © 2001 By Default! Chain of Command Squadron Commander of Air Group of USS Nimitz Commander, Navy forces Central Command Commander, US Forces Central Command A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 71 © 2001 By Default! Possible Test/Quiz Questions What are two types of Chain of Command Administrative and Operational – what does Administrative each do? each Who is part of the National command Who Authority? Authority? When was the Secretary of Defense position When created? Who is he now? created? Know entire Chain of Command and Joint Know Chiefs of Staff? Chiefs A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk ...
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This note was uploaded on 07/12/2011 for the course N S 302 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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