Lesson 10 Damage Control Overview

Lesson 10 Damage Control Overview - Damage Control Overview...

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Unformatted text preview: Damage Control Overview Damage Learning Objectives Learning The student will know the requirements for looking ahead in shipboard damage control training and preparedness. The student will shipboard damage organization and responsibilities assigned. know the typical control the of key personnel Slide 3 © 2001 By Default! Learning Objectives The student will know how shipboard watertight integrity is obtained through installed features to increase material conditions of readiness. The student will know the various conditions of readiness. The student will know the importance of preventive damage A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk WHY ? WHY Slide 6 © 2001 By Default! Intro Ships at sea are isolated from shore help and usually help from other ships; therefore, the crew must be capable of handling any damage the ship may encounter. Ninety percent of the damage control needed to save a ship takes place before the damage occurs. Damage control is an all-hands evolution. Everyone on a ship must be general damage control A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 7 © 2001 By Default! Damage Control Damage control is a 3-phase activity. – Prevent the damage. – Minimize the effects of damage. – Restore the ship to an effective fighting unit. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 8 © 2001 By Default! Damage Control Effective requires. damage control – Organization. – Education. – Training. – Maintenance of equipment. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 9 © 2001 By Default! Damage Control Organization POSITION/COC LOCATION CO CIC/Bridge CHENG (DC Officer) Main Control DC Assistant DC Central DCA Locker Officers/Leaders Repair Locker Scene Leaders Scene of damage A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 10 © 2001 By Default! DCC Damage Control Central – The “brain” of the DC central nervous system. – DCA controls repair parties from here. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 11 © 2001 By Default! Repair Parties The larger the ship the greater the number of repair parties. Repair parties found on a DDG/FFG. – REPAIR PARTY LOCATION. • Repair 2 Forward repair. • Repair 5 Propulsion repair. • Repair 3 After repair. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 12 © 2001 By Default! Compartmentation A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 13 © 2001 By Default! Compartmentation Navy ships are extensively compartmented. This compartmentation acts as a barrier to fires and flooding and prevents further damage. Navy ships are built to withstand the solid flooding of a certain number of compartments without sinking. This passive defense is surrendered if watertight integrity is not maintained A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 14 © 2001 By Default! Compartment Numbering Compartment System System 6-150-0-E, What does it mean? Deck Number. – The main deck is the basis for this numbering The scheme and is numbered 1. The first deck below the main deck is numbered 2, and so on. The first horizontal division above the main deck is numbered 01, and the numbers continue consecutively for subsequent upper division boundaries. division A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 15 © 2001 By Default! Compartment Numbering Compartment System System 6-150-0-E, What does it mean? Frame Number. – The forward perpendicular is the basis for this The numbering scheme and is numbered "0" (zero). "Frames" are consecutively numbered, based on frame spacing, until the aft perpendicular is reached. reached. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 16 © 2001 By Default! Compartment Numbering Compartment System System 6-150-0-E, What does it mean? Position in relation to centerline of ship. – The ship's centerline is the basis for this numbering The scheme. Compartments located so that the centerline of the ship passes through them are assigned the number 0. Compartments located completely to starboard of the centerline are given odd numbers, and those to port of centerline are given even numbers. The first compartment outboard of the centerline to starboard is 1, the second is 3 and so forth. Similarly, the first compartment outboard the centerline to port is 2, the second is 4 and so forth. second A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 17 © 2001 By Default! Compartment Numbering Compartment System System 6-150-0-E, What does it mean? Compartment use – A capital letter is used to identify the assigned primary capital use of the compartment use • A: Storage area • C: Ship and Fire Control operating spaces normally manned • E: Machinery spaces which are normally manned • F: Fuel or Fuel Oil tanks • J: JP-5 tank • L: Living quarters • M: Ammunition • Q: Areas not otherwise covered • T: Vertical access trunk A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk • Slide 18 © 2001 By Default! Compartmentation A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 19 © 2001 By Default! Material Condition of Readiness Explains which doors, hatches and fittings are permitted open (the ship’s level of watertight integrity). – X-ray (X): Provides the least protection and is set when there is no danger of attack or damage. All fittings marked with a black “X” shall be closed. – Yoke (Y): Set and maintained at sea and in port during wartime or outside normal working hours. All fittings marked with a black “Y” shall be closed in addition to all “X” fittings. – Zebra (Z): Set during general quarters; provides the maximum protection for the A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 20 © 2001 By Default! Special Classifications William (W). – Sea suction valves and fittings that serve vital systems’ cooling water and other fittings and equipment necessary for fire protection and mobility. They are closed only to prevent further damage. Circle X and Circle Y. – Letter within a black circle. Signifies that may be opened without special permission, but must be secured immediately after use. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 21 © 2001 By Default! Special Classifications Circle Z. – Letter within a red circle. May be opened with permission of the CO during general quarters for the comfort of the crew. Guarded when opened for immediate closure, if necessary. Circle W. – Letter within a black circle. Signifies ventilation fittings that are normally open and operating, but may have to be closed to prevent contamination from CBR attack or smoke. When closed, the habitability of the ship decreases A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 22 © 2001 By Default! Special Classifications Dog Z – Fittings marked with a red “Z” inside a black “D” are closed to darken the ship. (Accesses to weather decks not equipped with light traps or door switches; porthole covers, etc.) D z A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 23 © 2001 By Default! Darkened Ship US Ship’s have a distinct lighting pattern Will darken their lighting to mask their Will location to their enemy location A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 24 © 2001 By Default! Deceptive Lighting US Naval Ships will change their lighting US configuration to appear from a distance to be a different type of ship. For instance, a Carrier will change their lighting scheme to look like a merchant ship when going through the Straits of Hormuz. through USS Enterprise - "A ship this size uses a lighting USS configuration unlike any other on the planet," said Gregg. "Changing from our norm requires careful forethought, some ingenuity, and when the call is made, rapid action through implementation of pre-planned responses." implementation A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 25 © 2001 By Default! Conclusion It is the responsibility of all hands to maintain the material condition in effect. If it is necessary to break the condition, permission must be obtained (from OOD or DCC). A DC closure log is maintained in DCC at all times. A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 26 © 2001 By Default! USS George Washington 22 May 2008 – Off the Pacific Coast of South 22 America, fire occurred that injures 37 sailors with no fatalities with Fire broke out in the ship’s air-conditioning Fire and refrigeration space and an auxiliary boiler room boiler Quickly spread via cableway caused extreme Quickly heat in many parts of the ship heat A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 27 © 2001 By Default! USS George Washington 27 May 2008 – Ship pulls into San Diego for 27 repairs repairs 20 June – Announced damage was more 20 serious than believed and would cost $70 million to fix. Turnover with Kitty Hawk delayed delayed 13 July – 13,000 Japanese protest in 13 Yokosuka Yokosuka A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 28 © 2001 By Default! USS George Washington “Entirely Preventable” – caused by Entirely unauthorized smoking in a room where 115 US Gallons of flammable refrigerant compressor oil was improperly stored compressor With the smoke spreading the crew took With eight hours to discover the source of the flames and the fire had spread to 8 decks and 80 compartments and A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 29 © 2001 By Default! USS George Washington "It is apparent from this extensive study that there were "It numerous processes and procedures related to fire prevention and readiness and training that were not properly functioning. The extent of damage could have been reduced had numerous longstanding firefighting and firefighting management deficiencies been corrected.“ management 30 July – ADM Willard, Commander US 30 Pacific Fleet, relieves CAPT Dykhoff of his duties as Commanding Officer citing “a loss of confidence in his ability to command and his failure to meet mission requirements and readiness standards readiness A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 30 © 2001 By Default! USS George Washington XO CAPT Dober relieved for “substandard XO performance” performance” Six other sailors disciplined with Non-Judicial Six Punishment – 4 sailors found guilty of negligence and dereliction of duty for not properly supervising the workspace properly A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk Slide 31 © 2001 By Default! Possible Test/Quiz Questions Why is Damage Control DC important for a Why Naval Ship? Is it an all hands evolution? Naval What are the three phases of DC? What is the DCC How does the numbering go on a Ship? What are the conditions of readiness? A Free sample background from www.pptbackgrounds.fsnet.co.uk ...
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This note was uploaded on 07/12/2011 for the course N S 302 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas.

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