Lesson 3 Navy in the Napoleonic Era, 1783-1815

Lesson 3 Navy in the Napoleonic Era, 1783-1815 - Sea Power...

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Sea Power and Maritime Affairs Lesson 3: Defining the American Navy The U.S. Navy in the Napoleonic Era, 1783-1815
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Learning Objectives Comprehend the influence of European events upon American trade and naval policy during this period. Understand and be able to explain the term “Battle of Annihilation.” Know the causes and operations of the Quasi-War with France. Know the background of Jefferson’s defensive naval strategy including the use of gunboats and forts.
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Learning Objectives Know and be able to recall operations against the Barbary corsairs during this period. Comprehend the main factors of the European war and their effect on causing the War of 1812. Understand and be able to explain the term “Guerre de Course.” Know the U.S. and British Naval Strategy during the war.
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Learning Objectives Comprehend the Great Lakes campaign and its importance to the U.S. war effort. Comprehend (compare and contrast) the naval strategies of Rodgers and Decatur. Comprehend the significance of the Washington and New Orleans campaigns. Know the contributions of the U.S. Navy during the war of 1812, and assess the state of the Navy after the treaty of Ghent .
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Remember our Themes! The Navy as an Instrument of Foreign Policy Interaction between Congress and the Navy Interservice Relations Technology Leadership Strategy and Tactics Evolution of Naval Doctrine
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A New Nation Articles of Confederation Weak central government No power of taxation Congress unable to fund a Navy after Rev War. 1785 - All Continental Navy warships decommissioned New maritime trade markets- Large American merchant fleet China and Mediterranean Sea American merchant ships were no longer protected by the Royal Navy.
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A word on Neutrality… US wanted to trade with anyone, anywhere “Free ships make free goods” Belligerents didn’t want US taking their trade during war
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A New Nation Barbary States -- North Africa Demands for tribute to guarantee safe passage in Mediterranean. War of the French Revolution -- U.S. neutral rights violated. France – The Berlin Decree Great Britain - Orders in Council French Privateers seize American merchants Britain ordered cruisers to secretly seize American shipping operating in French West Indies
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Naval Policy Debate Begins U.S. Constitution - 1788. Stronger federal government with ability to tax. “The Congress shall have Power To provide and maintain a Navy.” “The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States.” Federalists: New England -- Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, John Adams Proponents of a strong Navy. Ensure neutral rights on the seas and protect vital trade interests.
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This note was uploaded on 07/12/2011 for the course GOV 365L taught by Professor Liu during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lesson 3 Navy in the Napoleonic Era, 1783-1815 - Sea Power...

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