Lesson 13 The US Navy in the Early Cold War, 1945-1953

Lesson 13 The US Navy in the Early Cold War, 1945-1953 -...

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Unformatted text preview: Sea Power and Maritime Affairs Lesson 13: The Navy in the Early Cold War, 1945-1953 Learning Objectives Know the reasons for the post World War II decline of the U.S. Navy. Comprehend the impact of the defense reorganizations in 1947 and 1949 on the role of the U.S. naval service. Know the impact of the balanced force strategy on the role of U.S. naval service. Know the factors which provided the impetus for change in national military strategy in 1950. Know the major contributions of the Navy and Marine Corps during the Korean War. Yalta Conference February 1945 YALTA CONFERENCE 1945 The Cold War The Cold War 1947-1989 Constant global confrontation between the Soviet Union and United States Avoidance of direct armed conflict between the two Superpowers End of World War II United Nations established MacArthur commands U.S. army of occupation in Japan Germany divided into zones of occupation Federal Republic of (West) Germany - 1949 U.S. initially enjoys atomic bomb monopoly Neglect of conventional military forces begins Communist control of Eastern Europe Puppet states dominated by the Soviet Union U.S. Naval Forces after WW II Rapid demobilization begins Postwar tasking: Return troops, POWs, and refugees to the U.S. Minesweeping Must make do with still-new World War II equipment Drastic reduction in size of force - 1945 to 1950: Personnel: 4 million to less than 500,000 Ships: 1,200 to less than 250 Small numbers of ships stationed in the Far East and Mediterranean Truman inspects Navy Ship, 1945 Reduction in Force: Navy and Marine Corps Personnel: Navy Personnel: Marines Major Combatants Aircraft 1945 1950 3,400,000 5,000 475,000 75,000 1,200 237 40,000 4,300 Search for New Roles Austerity No weapons systems except nuke Navy makes do with WWII equipment Instability Pacific U.S. ambivalence toward China Role of 7 th Fleet and Naval forces Far east Europe Instability in Turkey, Greece, Italy and France Gradual withdrawal of Brits Groundwork for U.S. role in Med National Security Act of 1947...
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Lesson 13 The US Navy in the Early Cold War, 1945-1953 -...

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