The Basic Facts About Radio Wave Bands

The Basic Facts About Radio Wave Bands - The Basic Facts...

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Unformatted text preview: The Basic Facts About Radio Wave Bands (Click on the Radio Bands to Find out More) Click on the image to get a larger version. Radio waves are broadcast in a number of bands which each contain a range of frequencies and have different ways of traveling from point to point through the Earth's atmosphere. Each broadcast station is assigned a set frequency within a band. You tune in by locating this frequency on your radio dial. Because of the different paths that radio waves take through the ionosphere, each band is affected differently by space weather storms. Click on the items below to find out more. Long Wave AM (Medium Wave) Short Wave FM, TV ( Very High Frequency = VHF) UHF (Ultra High Frequency) The Long Wave Radio Band & Space Weather Radio Band Uses Long Wave (Frequencies: 150-300 kHz, Wavelengths: 1000-2000 meters) Navigation & military communication Wave Paths Effects of Space Storms Ground wave curves around the Earth's Signals are attenutated when the lowest regions (below 75 km in day and 90 km at night) of the ionosphere, called the D and E regions , are disturbed. Effected by solar x- rays, geomagnetic storms, electron surface for thousands of kilometers. precipitation events, ionospheric substorms, Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) events and high altitude nuclear bursts)....
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This document was uploaded on 09/16/2011.

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The Basic Facts About Radio Wave Bands - The Basic Facts...

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