Chapter4 - Chapter 4 Displaying Quantitative Data Example...

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Chapter 4 Displaying Quantitative Data
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Example The speeds of 15 cars were measured by a radar device on a city street: 27 23 22 38 43 24 35 26 28 18 20 25 23 22 52
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How to display a Quantitative Variable? To display quantitative variables, we can’t count every single number. So instead, we slice up the entire span of values covered by the quantitative variable into equal- width piles called bins . Then, we count the number of values that fall into each bin. The bins and the counts in each bin give the distribution of the quantitative variable.
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Bins and Counts Bins Count 10 - 19 1 20 - 29 10 30 - 39 2 40 - 49 1 50 - 59 1
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Histogram We can display the bin counts in a display called a histogram. Like a bar chart, a histogram plots the bin counts as the height of the bars. Remember in the bar charts we have spaces in between each bar. For the histogram, the only time there will be spaces is when there are no data values for that corresponding bin.
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Histogram for Speeds Speeds on Radar 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 10 - 19 20 - 29 30 - 39 40 - 49 50 - 59 Speed Count
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Distribution When we describe a distribution, you should always tell about 3 things: its shape, center, and spread.
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Shape A histogram with one main peak is called unimodal. A histogram with two peaks is called bimodal. A histogram with three or more peaks are called multimodal. A histogram with no peaks is called uniform.
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2011 for the course AMAT 108 taught by Professor Sutphin during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Albany.

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Chapter4 - Chapter 4 Displaying Quantitative Data Example...

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