Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 In the late 1600s, King Charles II...

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Chapter 3 In the late 1600s, King Charles II extended his royal power across all of the English trading system through the restoration of mercantilism policies Through the Navigation Acts, King Charles II forced the English colonies to only do trade with England, so that England would make the most profit from them. These Acts also said that only English ships were allowed in the colonist’s ports, which meant that the Dutch, who “paid the highest prices for tobacco, sold the best goods, and provided the cheapest shipping services,” could not trade with them The Navigation Acts took a large amount of money away from the colonists, but gave a lot to the English, which made the colonists very unhappy The Glorious Revolution was the overthrow of King James II in 1688 The Glorious Revolution led to the English power in the colonies being limited, and more power being given to the colonial assemblies There were some unhappy colonists, however, because the newly appointed King William III and
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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 In the late 1600s, King Charles II...

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