judaism

judaism - Table1 All of the Orthodox movements are very...

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Unformatted text preview: Table1 All of the Orthodox movements are very similar in their observance and beliefs, differing only in the details that are emphasized. They also differ in their attitudes toward modern culture and the state of Israel. Table2 Orthodox Judaism views itself as the continuation of the beliefs and practices of normative Judaism, as accepted by the Jewish nation at Mt. Sinai and codified in successive generations in an ongoing process that continues to this day. This is similar to the view of the Conservative movement, but the Orthodox movement holds that such information (except for scribal errors) is the exact word of God and does not represent any human creativity or influence. For the Orthodox, the term “Torah” refers to the “Written Law” as interpreted by the “Oral Law,” Table3 Hasidic Judaism, which forms part of the right wing of Orthodoxy , develops the strongest opposition to modernity. It tends to take a strongly fundamentalist view of tradition and emphasizes the mystical modernity....
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This note was uploaded on 09/20/2011 for the course REL 2011 taught by Professor Bot during the Summer '08 term at FIU.

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judaism - Table1 All of the Orthodox movements are very...

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