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Entry 7 - John Malloy Portfolio 6 Entry 7 Twelfth Night 1...

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John Malloy Portfolio 6, Entry 7 Twelfth Night 1. Black (or dark) Humor: A form of humor that regards human suffering as absurd rather than pitiable, or that considers human existence as ironic and pointless but somehow comic. Act II, Scene iii - Act V, Scene i Dark humor is a recurring item throughout Twelfth Night . The best example of it is the joke played on Malvolio. Starting in Act II, Scene iii, the cruel joke is kept up throughout the entire plot. This can be considered dark humor because of the cruelty shown toward Malvolio. It is meant in good fun, but is in no way funny. It leads to Malvolio nearing insanity and being humiliated. 2. Deadpan Humor: A form of comic delivery in which humor is presented without a change in emotion or facial expression, usually speaking in a monotonous manner. 3.1.26-30 Viola: I warrant thou art a merry fellow and car’st for nothing. Feste: Not so, sir, I do care for something; but in my conscience, sir, I do not care for you. If that be to care for nothing, sir, I would it would make you invisible. This is an example of deadpan humor because Feste says this in the middle of their conversation. It is meant in good humor, but said without much conviction. Feste simply states that he cares not for Viola in a matter of fact tone. 3.
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Entry 7 - John Malloy Portfolio 6 Entry 7 Twelfth Night 1...

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