The Apology study guide

The Apology study guide - Cameron Hartman 9/24/09 PHIL...

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Cameron Hartman 9/24/09 PHIL 216—Plato’s Apology Study Guide 1. Socrates is being charged for two things: 1. That he does not believe in the gods, and that he teaches physical explanations for various phenomena instead of supernatural explanations; and 2. That he teaches the elements of how to win an argument, even if your argument is weaker (and it is also said that Socrates charged a fee for these teachings). This is not a fair trial, and the charges at hand are not legitimate. 2. Socrates’ response to the first argument listed above is that he does not pretend to have any knowledge of divine matters, nor is he interested in them, so he obviously wouldn’t teach them. Socrates then denies ever charging a fee for his teachings, and he criticizes the teachings of the sophists. He also adds that he lacks the knowledge to teach these skills. I do not believe Socrates was trying to get himself acquitted, but I believe he was trying to make the jury aware of the potential consequences to them for putting an innocent man to death. Socrates also touched several times that he always speaks the truth and that if he did not do that now he would be
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The Apology study guide - Cameron Hartman 9/24/09 PHIL...

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