Last_3_R - HowtoReadandStudyfromTextbooksandArticles Review...

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How to Read and Study from Textbooks and Articles Review 1. What is the mnemonic for reading and studying a textbook?  2. What does the letter “P” stand for in the reading approach presented in the  first workshop?  3. Turn this subheading into a question: “The Neuroglia of the Peripheral  Nervous System”  4. Make a question out of this heading: “Stress and the Immune System:  Resistance to Disease”  5. How can a reader rehearse what he or she has read?  Learning Lab – PQ3R Page 1
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Tips for Marking Texts What to look for in texts Headings and subtitles Signal words Definitions Examples Lists Italics or bold print Charts and graphs How to mark texts Read (and reread if necessary) before marking texts Develop a consistent method for marking texts Differentiate main ideas from details by using double lines, single lines or  different colored markers Use the margins of the text to indicate where important information is  within the text place asterisks *, arrows                        and abbreviations  such as def and ex in the margins Learning Lab – PQ3R Page 2
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Try to identify only one main idea per paragraph Use the margins of the text for summaries How to be actively engaged in the texts Preview the text using PQ3R Note repetition of ideas, use of synonyms Make connections – relate material to previous reading Rework the marked text material into notes.  Reading Rehearsal: The Second R (Marking and Annotating) BALANCE IT OUT! T HE SECRET TO COLLEGE SUCCESS IS DISCOVERING THAT TINE LINE BETWEEN STRESS OUT AND VEG OUT Which of the following new college students has the best shot at success? “I read ahead in all my books and told my friends I couldn’t go out,” says Tamika, a college freshman. “It's only been a week, and I'm already tired, but this is college - isn't that what it's supposed to be like? After all, I have to keep my GPA up if I'm going to get into the education program.” “I'd heard the profs take it easy the first week,” says her friend Jodi, “So I'm not that bummed that I slept through most of my early-morning classes. And who knew books costs so much? I haven't even bought half of them yet.” If you guessed that Tamika has the best shot at success, you’re right. ..but only to a point. Let's face it: Adjusting to college classes can be difficult. You have to get used to different work loads and teaching styles from the ones you remember from high school. If you're like Tamika, you'll probably start off working extra hard right away - and risking burning out. Or, if you’re like Jodi, you may start college a little too laid back — and risk failing far behind. The truth is, you'll need to find a balance between
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Last_3_R - HowtoReadandStudyfromTextbooksandArticles Review...

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