PQR - TRUEORFALSE 1.Thefasteronereads,thebetterreaders/heis...

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TRUE OR FALSE 1. The faster one reads, the better reader s/he is.  _________ 2.  People who read slowly can never be good readers.  _________ 3. The main point in reading is to make certain that your eyes see every word.  _________ 4. Reading with a question in mind is very confusing to the reader. _________ 5. Each person gets slightly different ideas from what is read. _________ 6. Stopping to think about what one is reading is a useful technique. _________ 7. One should be most concerned with remembering all the details in reading.  _________ 8. A newspaper, a poem, a novel or an economics text should be each be read  differently.  _________ 9. Sometimes it is possible to understand the meanings of unfamiliar words from  the rest of the sentence or paragraph.   _________ 10. Looking up words in the dictionary slows up reading too much. _________ 11. Skimming material quickly is a bad technique to use when reading.  _________ 12. One should accept unquestioningly whatever is written in a book. _________ 13. One should never write in a book. _________ 14. Underlining is the best method for remembering what you read. _________ Learning Lab – Master Student Workshop 1
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15. The more widely a person reads, the better reader s/he becomes. _________ Learning Lab – Master Student Workshop 2
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PQ3R: A READING/STUDY TECHNIQUE PQ3R is best used with textbook material, but it can also be applied to some  articles.  P    = PREVIEW 1. Read the title and ask yourself what you already know about this topic. 2. Read the introduction to the selection to get an idea of the content and          purpose.  3. Skim through the selection, noting  a. headings and subheadings b. words in  bold  or  italics  c. information in sidebars d. diagrams, pictures, graphs 4. Read the summary at the end to identify main ideas, concepts, and  terms Q    =  QUESTION Turn each heading or subheading into a question.  Ask “what?” “who?”  “where?” “when?”  Try to also ask “why?” and “how?”   Write these  questions in the  book or on a separate sheet of paper.  Use them to  establish some purposes for reading.   Over time you will be able to  develop more sophisticated questions.  R    = READ Read to answer your questions.  Note other important information.  Mark  the text  AFTER you read – do not underline or highlight WHILE reading,  but wait until you have finished a paragraph or section. Try to make  marginal notes – brief summaries, in your own words, of what you have  read, comments, or more questions.
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