Race and Ethnic Relations - Chapter One Race and Ethnic...

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Chapter One Race and Ethnic Relations by Joe R. Feagin and Clairece B. Feagin, Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall, 1996. [Powerpoint Presentation developed by Ron L. . Shamwell, Social Sciences, Community College of Philadelphia, 1999]. “Susie search in the 1970’s lead her to understand that because she had a certain type of blood she was designated something other than what she established by legal marriage to someone of another race. What implications might this have for children, who find themselves in similar situations--Bi-Racial Issues.
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Chapter One Basic Concepts in Race and Ethnic Relations Point[s]: What starts with a search for color between black and white indicates how ancestry is use to define a person’s color. This controversy raises the basic question of how a person comes to be defined as white or black in the United States. [See Stephen J. Gould’s article, the “Geometer of Race”]. Initially race was considered to be a continuum until it was converted to a hierarchy.
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Chapter One Basic Concepts in Race and Ethnic Relations A logical place to start making sense out of this definitional controversy is with basic terms and concepts: Sixteenth-Seventeenth-Century Europe descendants of a common ancestor, kinship linkages rather than physical characteristics defined race. In the late Eighteenth Century race came to mean a distinct category of human beings with physical characteristics transmitted by descent. Here the shift moved from common ancestor to distinct categories based on physical characteristics, which was more continuum base than that of a hierarchy. But this was soon to change based on early scientific information.
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Chapter One Basic Concepts in Race and Ethnic Relations Continuum
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Chapter One Basic Concepts in Race and Ethnic Relations Significant Changes : Francios Bernier -First European to sort human beings into distinct categories . Led to the development of hierarchy of physical distinct groups[not classified yet as races ] . However, based on color and culture considerations Europeans and Africans were sit at the top an bottom of the hierarchy. Immanuel Kant -First to use the term race in the sense of biological distinct categories of human beings Johann Blumenback -First to classification[1775] of all human beings into five racial groups was perhaps the most influential. First to coin the term Caucasians. This established a clear racial hierarchy. The five racial groups were:
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Basic Concepts in Race and Ethnic Relations Caucasians=Europeans Mongolians=Asians Ethiopians=Africans Native American=Americans Malays=Polynesians Fact: But because most of the early contact was small except for the slave colonies, the classification of race was not developed from close scientific observations . “Rather, race was, from its inception, a folk classification, a product of popular beliefs about human differences that evolved from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries”. I will be helping the professor
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Race and Ethnic Relations - Chapter One Race and Ethnic...

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