10 - Keep Up

10 - Keep Up - 20 | P a g e 1 1 / 2 4 / 2 0 0 8 G R E E N E...

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Unformatted text preview: 20 | P a g e 1 1 / 2 4 / 2 0 0 8 G R E E N E F F O R T S E M B R A C E P O O R ; M O R E A R E A S A R E U P D A T I N G H O U S I N G T O C U T E N E R G Y U S E A N D U T I L I T Y B I L L S Low-income people who live in old or flimsy housing are becoming prime targets for cities and groups intent on slashing energy use. Recent efforts to cut energy consumption in the home have focused on new construction, often in more affluent areas and public buildings. Now, community organizations and cities that have embraced the green effort are homing in on low-income houses and apartments to reduce emissions and help poor people lower their utility bills. "That area is getting a lot more attention now," says Tom Deyo, senior adviser for Green Strategies at NeighborWorks America, a non-profit that promotes homeownership and affordable housing through more than 230 local organizations. It launched a website this month designed to help create greener and healthier housing and neighborhoods....
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10 - Keep Up - 20 | P a g e 1 1 / 2 4 / 2 0 0 8 G R E E N E...

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