14 - Keep Up

14 - Keep Up - 28 | P a g e 1/5/2009 FLY I NG ON VEGETABL...

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28 | P a g e 1 / 5 / 2 0 0 9 F L Y I N G O N V E G E T A B L E S The scheduled flight on Wednesday of a Continental Airlines 737 fueled in part by biofuels made from jatropha and algae was experimental (see my report on the state of biofuels in the airline industry from Wednesday’s paper here). But if the fuel can be certified by international standards agencies, it could become as common as, say, ethanol added to gasoline. It might be even more so, because the goal is a “drop-in” substitute that can be used at any percentage, in any jet or any airport fueling system. In theory, people in the industry say, replacing petroleum in airplanes could be easier than replacing it in cars, even though jet fuel has to meet specifications that are of little concern on the highway, like weight (hauling fuel is a major use of fuel, after all), or how well it flows at 40 degrees below zero, which is a temperature big planes face for hours as they cruise in the stratosphere. Because fuel quality has such importance to safety, some energy experts thought aviation
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14 - Keep Up - 28 | P a g e 1/5/2009 FLY I NG ON VEGETABL...

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