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18 - Keep Up

18 - Keep Up - 36 | P a g e 2 2 2 0 0 9 SA V I N G E N E R...

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Unformatted text preview: 36 | P a g e 2 / 2 / 2 0 0 9 SA V I N G E N E R G Y W I T H A F O U R - D A Y W O R K W E E K A new trend in energy savings has much in common with the fantasies of political conservatives: shutting down the government (for a day, at least). Last summer Utah went to a four-day work week, hoping that savings on state utility bills would yield $3 million a year. (Each work day became ten hours long, rather than eight.) In the current budget crunch, several other states — including West Virginia and even New York — have considered the possibility of following Utah’s lead, as have towns like Spring Lake in North Carolina. In Idaho, some schools want to move to a four-day week, while keeping equal numbers of classes, while some districts in Arizona and Oregon have considered similar moves. Contemplating a proposed eight-hour school day in Idaho, one sophomore said, “I don’t think I’d be able to pay attention at all,” according to KLEW, a local television station....
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