05) 01 Sept 2010

05) 01 Sept 2010 - David L. Nelson and Michael M. Cox...

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LEHNINGER PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY Fifth Edition David L. Nelson and Michael M. Cox © 2008 W. H. Freeman and Company CHAPTER 3 Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins
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Genes encode proteins Amino acids comprise proteins All life utilize the same 20 amino acids The “side chains” (R groups) define amino acid properties “From these building blocks different organisms can make such widely diverse products as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, transporters, muscle fibers, the lens protein of the eye, feathers, spider webs, rhinoceros horn, milk proteins, antibiotics, mushroom poisons, and myriad other substances having distinct biological activities”
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α β γ δ ε ϖ ϖ-3 OH O
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D and L notation, based on optical rotation, used to denote chiralty Not useful for multiple chiral centers – use R,S Used to describe the α -carbon Alanine – methyl R group Priority NH 3 + > COO - > CH 3 > H S isoform All life use the L (S) isoform In some bacteria, the enzyme “racemase” convert L-Ala to D-Ala for cell walls
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course CHEM 3510 taught by Professor Mueser during the Spring '10 term at Toledo.

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05) 01 Sept 2010 - David L. Nelson and Michael M. Cox...

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