09) 13 Sept 2010

09) 13 Sept 2010 - Test#1 Friday 17 Sept 2010 100 pts...

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Test #1 Friday 17 Sept 2010 100 pts Chapters 1 – 4
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Circular dichroism - difference in absorbance ( ∆ε ) of right versus left circularly polarized light Difference spectra can be used to identify secondary structure
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Kendrew solved the structure of myoglobin Perutz solved the structure of hemoglobin http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/articles/perutz/index.html
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Diffraction of X-rays by crystals of protein can be used to determine the atomic structure of the molecule X-rays scatter coherently by electrons, the pattern can be used to calculate the real space electron density
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Myoglobin has 8 α -helices (A-H) with an iron containing porphyrin ring cofactor (protoporphyrin IX) The coordinates for the molecule are stored in the Protein DataBank (RCSB PDB) – myoglobin is PDB 1MBN Ribbons are used to display the secondary structures PyMol is one of many programs available to view and create figures of molecules
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The porphyrin resides in a crevice between helices E and F 5 nitrogens coordinate the ferrous iron (Fe 2+ ) – 4 from the porphyrin and one from the “proximal” histidine which is located at the C-terminal end of the F helix The “distal” histidine, located in the middle of the E helix, crowds the bound oxygen
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Hemoglobin is a heterotetramer of globins – two α and two β The β chain is very similar to myoglobin The α chain is missing the D-helix
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This note was uploaded on 09/18/2011 for the course CHEM 3510 taught by Professor Mueser during the Spring '10 term at Toledo.

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09) 13 Sept 2010 - Test#1 Friday 17 Sept 2010 100 pts...

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