eth final project

eth final project - There is no Mistake by the Lake...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
There is no Mistake by the Lake: Cleveland is Great 1 There is no Mistake by the Lake: Cleveland is Great Kristopher Glover Axia Eth/125
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
There is no Mistake by the Lake: Cleveland is Great 2 There is no Mistake by the Lake: Cleveland is Great Where you live shapes who you are and shapes your views, whether good or bad, on the value of diversity. My view on diversity is positive because of the wonderful diversity and exchange of customs, traditions, and experiences living in Cleveland have given me. I have grown up all my live hearing people ridicule my city. Cleveland for many years was a joke and just saying the name “Cleveland” got laughs for many comedians. But Cleveland, the home of Jacobs Field, the Indians, Case Western Reserve University and many other fine schools, the Cleveland Symphony, and many cultural, athletic, and business and entertainment opportunities (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame) is a great place to live. One of the best things about Cleveland, and perhaps one of the reasons why it is such a wonderful place to live, is its vast diversity. Cleveland’s residents come from many countries, practice many different religions, eat many different foods, and have shared all of these differences, and their many different customs with all residents of the city. Cleveland has a Little Italy neighborhood, a Czechoslovakian neighborhood, a Polish neighborhood, and many regions where certain ethnic groups have grown businesses and opened wonderful restaurants. The city’s residents themselves come from widely diverse ethnic and racial groups yet all live well together, proud of their individual heritage and proud of their lives as Cleveland, Ohio residents. As of the 2000 census the city of Cleveland had the following racial and ethnic residents: African American, 51.0%; Caucasian, 41.5%; Latino, 7.3%; and Asian/Indian, 1.6%. In comparison to Ohio, whose population breakdown in the year 2000 was, respectively, 11.5%, 85%, 1.9%, and 1.4%, you can see how much more diverse the city of Cleveland is then the rest of Ohio, which may be one of the many reasons why so many festivals and so many business and entertainment opportunities take place here instead of elsewhere in Ohio.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/20/2011 for the course IT 242 taught by Professor Clark during the Spring '11 term at Art Inst. Phoenix.

Page1 / 6

eth final project - There is no Mistake by the Lake...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online