The Offical Language Movement

The Offical Language Movement - Check Point: The Official...

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Check Point: The Official Language Movement Check Point: The Official Language Movement Kristopher Glover ETH/125 June 28, 2011
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Check Point: The Official Language Movement Political and Educational Facets of the Bilingualism Movement The first official federal recognition of the modern bilingual movement was the 1968 Bilingual Education Act, sponsored by Texas Senator Ralph Yarborough (Garcia, 2007). Its radical purpose was to support the use of Spanish in education, complementarily to the study of English. The bill, also known as Title VII ended up containing 37 different provisions and was a major step forward, both for the bilingual movement and civil rights. Updated four times since 1968, the BEA has helped schools make strides in supporting bilingual education by awarding competitive grants for staffing and instruction materials. Today there are a number of programs which, to varying degrees, advance the cause of the bilingual movement. Classes range from short term, transitional ESL for new students to full
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This note was uploaded on 09/20/2011 for the course IT 242 taught by Professor Clark during the Spring '11 term at Art Inst. Phoenix.

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The Offical Language Movement - Check Point: The Official...

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