US4275287

US4275287 - 219*181 62/23/81 SR GR 452759237"...

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Unformatted text preview: 219*181 62/23/81 SR GR 452759237" United States Patent [19] Hiratake [54] [75] [73] [21] [22] [30] Sep. 28, 1978 [JP] [52] [56] 3,361,927 3,403,277 PLASMA TORCH AND A METHOD OF PRODUCING A PLASMA g Inventor: Assignee: Appl. No.: Filed: Susumu Hiratake, Kasugai, Japan Daidoto Kushuko Kabushikaisha, ' Japan 22,651 Mar. 21, 1979 - Foreign Application Priority Data References Cited U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 1/ 1968 9/ 1968 Way et a1. ......... .. llBa § 23e § § 3% .\\\\\\\§\\\\\\\\\\\\\V 7 3 a F 5| ll8 “.4 5‘ .5. _ I §§§§?/ VF away 122 122 fir/Vl‘ a r /\/§ w Mm! W M\ at § a 23e WW\’ .9 m; as “w as at“ as a; as We ‘ 7w “8 é’ Japan .............................. .. 53-119575 [51] Int. Cl.3 .............................................. .. B23K 9/oo US. Cl. .................... .. 219/121 PR; 219/121 PA; 219/123 PP; 219/125 PQ [58] Field of Search ............... .. 219/121 P, 76.16, 123; 313/2314, 231.5; 13/2 P, 9.7 Buhler ............................ .. 219/121 P 219/121 P 3,445,191 5/1969 Brunning et al. .............. .. 219/121 P \\ \\\\\ \\\'.\\\. .““““\‘\ . .‘\ III[IIIIIIII[III/IIlI/I/IIIIWIIIIM ~o [11] 4,275,287 [45] Jun. 23, 1981 3,521,106 7/1970 Hess ................................ .. 219/121 P Primary Examiner—Elliot A. Goldberg Assistant Examiner—M. Paschall Attorney, Agent, or Firm—William A. Drucker [57] ABSTRACT A plasma torch includes an annular cathode having an annular peripheral edge from which an arc is dis- charged. A pair of annular nozzle elements are coaxially disposed on the opposite sides of the cathode. Each nozzle element has an annular edge hanging over the annular peripheral edge of the cathode, and the annular edges of the nozzle elements define therebetween an annular outlet opening for the torch. Gas is introduced between the cathode and the nozzle elements and emit- ted through the annular outlet opening in a plasma jet. A magnetic field is developed across the annular outlet opening to cause the plasma jet to rotate along the annu— lar peripheral edge of the cathode for its uniform emis- sion from the entire perimeter of the annular outlet opening. 3 Claims, 31 Drawing Figures \ 7/ v? V Y E' 6 KW \r‘ =’ no 120a \“fi 2 V a V \5 ('11,, mm VII/Luuua 573;??? -u.-." .-.-.---..--.. m§\\\\\\\\ V ans § ////////// \ a! n7 :\ w. IISb ‘~\\ : lBe v.4. A Vw” ‘ \ 4,275,287 \\\\\\‘ \\\\\\‘ \\ mm \L \S.\\, , mm II > \Mrn/DJIIIII-3V/IA. ‘1 n .5 MN. % .P L N mm 1 _m — %%’/lv\mm-l-“Valli/II/I/l/l/W”. mu. % om \\\\\\\§§V\.lfim \kIIV\\\\\\\§ l N. 1 a. .‘ lmvn_,III%//\ ' .3 B, 2 w a \ AA , A , \ . J a , a mm : 3 g R mm mm in, mm Pd.“— U.S. Patent 4,275,287 Sheet 2 of 11 ~ US. Patent Jun. 23, 1981 US Patent Jun. 23, 1981 Sheet 3 of 11 4,275,287 : I. - - 1 v IIIIl><-gi m Ill' ['IIII‘ :1“.- 1 H ‘ II 1:. iii InII>X<=E Sheet 4 of 11 Jun. 23, 1981 US. Patent /. FIGS-1 M346 1.56 .e a a .Db ,,e 69 6/”.6655 567 BR ll_ll I 1H // IN! 1 11:1 1 4/ 0% h W "Hull." Hull] W ...... -- e 7 L. e 6 A . 4,275,287 Sheet5 ofll Jun.23,1981 US. Patent \ 4 .I-I~UUHM~.H.“\ grill/dagggllllfl/gg§§\ / I A ‘ ~nuwmaw~§Vkuuwuunuwfifiumiiiiiu WIVMWA§§E§§ a7AaazaazamunaazzzannzzuuflzzmunzzzmmHWRmirh. AMMWV. §\\\\N§\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\NAat.iI9H41 gig/4%? r \ Vill/‘lflr/l/fl/ y gfifimggfiflrflflfi g § Villll/Azflr/IAgl‘?’lll¢f/¢fl?§wfl§ EN~§§§§x IIIIII‘ ‘ . //.f/¢r¢r£rf’df’ff47£rf”’1 Z § 4,275,287 Sheet6 of11 Jun.23,1981 US Patent US. Patent Jun. 23, 1981 Sheet 7 of 11 4,275,287 “h 12h 14h l5h 15g \ l , _ “\“W 11/ 15h US. Patent Jun. 23, 1981 Sheet 8 of 11 4,275,287 55a lSi Hi 26i lSi 55a FIGJZ H 15M. 12 VII/Ix /fl74 "/////////,,] . 7/17‘ US. Patent Jun. 23, 1981 Sheet 9 of 11 4,275,287 110 12 15 1.3 [W VII/m 51 Q A W V N“ L’///////A US. Patent Jun.‘23, 1981 sheej; 10 of 11 4,275,287 US. Patent 11111.23, 1981 Sheet 11 of 11 4,275,287 FIG.2§3 100 magi/'02 It I 26 '2 “=1 H FIG.27 ID? 108 HO 1H I I 1 v'u-III-nmannlnnnnn 4,275,287 1 PLASMA TORCH AND A METHOD OF; PRODUCING A PLASMA BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a plasma torch producing a plasma jet in an enlarged area in which to treat the material to be treated, and a method of generating a plasma extending over such an enlarged area. 2. Description of the Prior Art A typical plasma torch known in the art emits a plasma jet extending like a rod. This plasma jet has a very high temperature and travels exactly along a straight line, so that it can effectively be used for the localized heating of a particular place. It is very effec- tive for the purpose of locally heating only a particular spot of a large object and melting the material of that spot alone. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a plasma torch which produces a plasma jet in a sheetlike form. The "sheetlike extension of a plasma jet provides an enlarged area of radiation which makes it possible to heat a large surface of the work at a time. ' BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a plasma torch embodying this invention; FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line II——II of FIG. 1; FIG. _3 is a schematic cross-sectional view showing the operation of the plasma torch of FIG. 1; FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line IV—IV of FIG. 3; FIGS. 5-1 through 5-4 are sectional views illustrating different forms of plasma torch embodying this inven- tion; FIGS. 6 through 8 are fragmentary sectional views showing different examples of the plasma torch of this invention as emitting plasma jets in different directions; FIGS. 9 and 10 are diagrams showing different cir- cuits for supplying an electric current to the magnetic coil; FIG. 11 is a schematic sectional view of a modified form of magnetic field generator; FIGS. 12 through 15 illustrate different examples of the circuit through which an electric current is supplied to produce a plasma; FIGS. 16 and 17 are each a schematic illustration of the apparatus in which a plurality of plasma torches are employed in combination; and FIG. 18 through 28 illustrate a variety of arrange- ments in which the plasma torches of this invention may be applied. DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIGS. 1 through 4 of the drawings, there is shown a plasma torch 11 which'essentially com- prises a torch body 12 and a magnetic field generator 13. The torch body 12 includes an annular cathode 14 and a pair of nozzle elements 15 disposed on the oppo- site sides of the cathode 14 coaxially therewith. The cathode 14 is formed by an annular body 16 and an annular electrode member 17 attached to the inner pe- ripheral edge of the body 16. The electrode member 17 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 45 50 55 65 2 has an inner peripheral edge 18 from which an arc is emitted. As the electrode member 17 provides a source of emitting thermions, it is formed from a material hav- ing a high melting point and capable of emitting a large quantity of thermions, for example, tungsten containing thorium. The cathode body 16 is pierced with a water passage 19 through which water is circulated to cool the electrode member 17. The water passage 19 is annu- lar and encircles the electrode member 17. The cathode body 16 is provided on its outer periphery with a water inlet 20 leading to the water passage 19. The water inlet 20 is adapted for threaded connection with a water circulating pipe not shown. A terminal 21 is provided on the cathode body 16 to connect it with a power source. The nozzle elements 15 are formed from a material having a high melting point and a high thermal conduc- tivity, such as copper. Each of the nozzle elements 15 is somewhat spaced from the cathode 14 by an annular insulator 24. The nozzle elements 15 are held together by clamping bolts 22. Each nozzle element 15 has an inner peripheral edge 25 hanging over the inner periph- eral edge 18 Of the electrode member 17 as best shown in FIG. 1. The inner peripheral edges 25 of the two nozzle elements 15 define therebetWeen with the elec- trode member 17 an annular opening 26 communicating with a gas passage 23 formed between the cathode 14 and each nozzle element 15. The cathode body 16 is pierced with an annular gas passage 29 which is con- nected with the gas passages 23 through a plurality of L holes 30. The cathode body 16 is provided on its outer periphery with a gas inlet 31 leading to the gas passage 29. The gas inlet 31 is adapted for threaded connection with a gas pipe, not shown, for supplying gas through the gas passages 29 and 23 to the annular opening 26 in front of the electrode member 17. Each nozzle element 15 is pierced with an annular water passage 27 through which water is circulated to cool the inner peripheral edge 25. Each nozzle element 15 is provided on its outer periphery with a water inlet 28 leading to the water passage 27. The water inlet 28 is adapted for threaded connection with a water pipe, not shown, for circulat- ing water through the water passage 27. The magnetic field generator 13 includes a pair of annular coil supports 33 made of electrically insulating material and disposed on the opposite sides of the torch body 12 coaxially therewith. Each of the coil supports 33 supports a magnetic coil 34 thereon. Each magnetic coil 34 is associated with a magnetic core 35 which is formed from a magnetic material, such as Permalloy. The two cores 35 are held together by a cylindrical core 36 which is also made of a magnetic material. The cores 35 and 36 define a magnetic path in the magnetic field generator 13. Each of the magnetic cores 35 is pierced with an annular water passage 37 and provided on its outer periphery with a water inlet 38 leading to the water passage 37. The water inlet 38 is of construction adapted for threaded connection with a water pipe, not shown, for circulating water through the water passage 37. An annular heat shielding plate 39 is provided be- tween each nozzle element 15 and the corresponding one of the magnetic cores 35. The heat shielding plates 39 are made of a heat insulating material, such as alu- mma. To prepare the plasma torch 11 for operation, the magnetic coils 34 are electrically connected with a power source 45 for supplying an electric current to the 4,275,287 3 coils 34 as shown in FIG. 3. The plasma torch 11 has an axial hollow cylindrical chamber 41, in which the mate- rial 43 to be treated is placed. A power source 46 for supplying a direct current and a high frequency genera- tor 47 for ignition purposes are electrically connected across the cathode 14 and the material 43 to be treated. In the event the material 43 to be treated is to serve as an anode, the positive terminal of the power source 46 is electrically connected through a resistor 48 to the nozzle elements 15 to supply a pilot current to the noz- zle elements 15. In operation, a direction current is supplied from the power source 45 to the magnetic coils 34 to generate across the annular opening 26 in the torch body 12 a magnetic field oriented in a direction indicated by arrows H in FIG. 3 or a direction opposite thereto, so that the magnetic field may extend perpen- dicularly to the direction in which a plasma jet is emit- ted as will hereinafter be described. A gas intended to form a plasma, such as argon, hy- drogen and nitrogen, is introduced through the gas inlet 31, and ejected through the annular opening 26 toward the axis of the electrode member 17. At the same time, a direct current is applied across the cathode 14 and the material 43 to be treated, the latter serving as a positive electrode. A high frequency voltage in the order of several thousand volts is supplied from the high fre- quency generator 47 and applied across the cathode 14 and the nozzle elements 15 through the resistor 48 in a well known manner to develop a high frequency dis- charge between the cathode 14 and the nozzle elements 15, so that a pilot arc may be produced along the inner peripheral edge 18 of the electrode member 17. The material 43 to be treated is brought to a closer position relative to the pilot arc in a well known manner to develop a main are reaching from the annular opening 26 along the inner peripheral edge of the cathode 14 to the material 43 to be treated. To bring the material 43 closer to the pilot are, it may be mechanically displaced transversely. It is also possible to use a well known ignition rod. Alternatively, the material 43 to be treated may be provided with an increased diameter portion which may, at the time of ignition, be placed opposite to the inner peripheral edge 18 of the electrode member 17. The main are thus emitted from a portion of the inner peripheral edge 18 of the annular electrode mem- ber 17 through the annular opening 26 is immediately thereafter forced to rotate along the inner peripheral edge 18 of the electrode member 17 under the influence of the magnetic field prevailing across the annular open- ing 26. The rotation of the arc provides emission of a plasma jet 40 radially inwardly spreading from the inner peripheral edge 18 of the electrode member 17 over an annular region 42 having a uniform temperature distri- bution in which the material 43 to be treated may be effectively heated. The speed of rotation of the arc should be adjusted to suit the specific application for which the plasma torch will be used, since it depends on the amperage of the plasma, the intensity of the magnetic field produced by the magnetic field generator, the rate of flow of the gas introduced to produce a plasma, and the distance be- tween the cathode and the anode or the material to be treated. The rotation of the are as described above causes a point of arc discharge to move along the inner periph- eral edge 18 of the electrode member 17. This permits uniform heating of the entire inner peripheral edge 18 of the electrode member 17, resulting in the enlargement 10 15 20 25 30 35 45 50 55 65 4 of the area from which thermions are emitted, making it possible to maintain a sufficiently high amperage in the plasma even at a relatively low temperature. Upon the beginning of the entire inner peripheral edge 18 to dis- charge an arc, the application of electric current to maintain the magnetic field may be discontinued if the inner peripheral edge 18 is at a temperature which is sufficiently high to enable a stable arc discharge from the inner peripheral edge 18. Since the inner peripheral edge 18 from which the arc is discharged can be maintained at a relatively low tem- perature, the plasma torch of this invention may be used to form a plasma from a gas having a higher content of active gas than is possible with the apparatus known in the art, without causing any increase whatsoever in the wear of the cathode due to the reaction thereof with the active gas. The apparatus of this invention may further include a gas shielding plate 44 closing a portion of the annular opening 26 as shown in FIG. 4 to define an inoperative region 49 in the cylindrical chamber 41 which may restrict the annular region 42 providing a space for treatment to a sectorial shape. This restriction of the space for treatment is beneficial for partial heating of the material 43 to be treated. While both the power source 45 and 46 have been described as a source of direct current, it is equally possible to use instead mutually synchronized sources of alternating current supply. attention is now directed to FIGS. 5-1 through 5-3 of the drawings in which another form of the plasma torch embodying this invention is shown. It includes a torch body 12e and a magnetic field generator 13e. The torch body 12e includes an inner nozzle 115 of the elongated tubular construction having an axial bore 51 extending along its entire length. The inner nozzle 115 comprises a body 115a formed from a magnetic material, and a nozzle element 115b made of copper and connected to one end of the body 1150. An outer nozzle 116 of the hollow cylindrical construction encircles the inner noz- zle 115 in coaxial relation therewith, and comprises a main body 1160 and a nozzle element 116b made of copper and connected to one end of the main body 116a. The nozzle element 116b of the outer nozzle 116 has a lower end having an internal wall surface shaped like a truncated cone. The lower end of the nozzel element 116b defines with the lower end of the inner nozzle element 115b an annular opening 269 through which an arc 40e is discharged. Because of the lower end configuration of the outer nozzle element 116b, the annular opening 26e does not lie in a flat plane, but resides in a curved plane having a part-spherical shape. Thus, the annular opening 26e is, at any portion thereof, directed at an angle toward a line extending through the longitudinal axis of the inner nozzle 115, so that the are 409 discharged through the annular opening 26c may take the shape of a funnel or a V shape in vertical cross section as shown in FIG. 5-1. The plasma torch further includes a cathode 14e of the hollow cylindrical con- struction interposed between the inner and outer noz- zles 115 and 116 coaxially therewith. The main body 115a of the inner nozzle 115 extends into a magnetic coil 34e in the magnetic field generator 13e and serves as a magnetic coil to transmit a magnetic field generated by the coil 34e to the annular opening 26e. Referring to FIGS. 5-2 and 5-3 showing further de- tails of the torch body 12e in an enlarged fashion, the cathode 14e also comprises a main body 16e and an 4,275,287 5 electrode member 17e connected to one end of the main body 16e. The electrode member 17e is removable from the main body 16e to facilitate replacement when it is worn after use. For the same reason, the nozzle ele- ments 115b and 11611 are also removable from the main bodies 1150 and 116a, respectively, of the inner and outer nozzles 115 and 116. The cathode Me, the inner nozzle 115 and the outer nozzle 116 are each pierced with a water passage 19e, 117 or 118 through which cooling water is circulated. A cylindrical spacer 120 is interposed between the inner nozzle 115 and the cathode 14c to maintain them in properly spaced relation from each other. The spacer 120 is also intended for stabilizing the flow of gas through a gas passage 23c and preventing a high fre- quency discharge from occurring between the inner nozzle 115 and the cathode l4e. The spacer 120 is formed from an electrically insulating material, such as - Teflon (trade name). The spacer 120 is, as shown in FIG. 5-3, provided with a plurality of longitudinal grooves 1200 through which gas flows to stabilize the flow of gas through the gas passage 23e. Such a spacer of an electrically insulating material is preferably pro- vided to extend along the entire length of the gas pas- sage 23e. The inner nozzle 115 is further encircled by a heat shielding sleeve 121 which is located below the spacer 120 in close proximity thereto in order to shield heat of an arc. The sleeve 121 is formed from a highly heat resistant material, for example, boron nitride. An- other cylindrical spacer 122 is interposed between the cathode 14e and the outer nozzle 116 and has a plurality of longitudinal grooves 1220. The spacer 122 is pro- vided for the same purposes as those for which the aforementioned spacer 120 is provided. The relative positions and dimensions of the inner nozzle 115, the outer nozzle 116 and the cathode Me at the lower ends thereof, as indicated at a, b, c, and d in FIG. 5-2, depend upon the current capacity for which the torch is designed, but are preferably determined to establish the following relationship in order to obtain a stabilized arc: a/bzl c:0.96b The plasma torch of FIG. 5-1 is operated in a similar manner to the apparatus of FIG. 1 to produce a plasma arc 40e. The magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generator 13e is transmitted to the annular opening 26e through the main body 115a of the inner nozzle 115 which is formed from a magnetic material. The plasma arc 40c thus discharged is forced to rotate in the vicinity of the annular opening 26e to define a funnel-shaped arc. Gas is preferably introduced into the gas passage 23e so as to rotate, upon ejection through the annular opening 268, in a direction equal to that of rotation of the arc to enhance rotation of the arc. The arc thus produced may be used for a variety of applications as hereunder mentioned. (1) Formation of a plasma from an active gas. An active gas which is to be transformed into a plasma is introduced thrOugh the axial bore 51 of the inner nozzle 115, and blown into the bottom of the funnel-shaped arc 40e, whereupon the active gas is heated by the arc 402 at high temperature and trans- formed into a plasms. The cathode l4e is not contacted with any of the active gas blown through the axial bore 10 15 20 25. 30 35 45 50 55 60 65 6 51, but is highly durable for a prolonged period of time without being corroded by any such active gas. Accordingly to the invention, the active gas is intro- duced into the center of the arc, so that all of the gas introduced can be transformed into a plasma. It is possi- ble to obtain a plasma of oxygen which may advanta- geously be used for high temperature refining opera- tions, particularly for the manufacture of ultra-low car- bon steel by decarburization. It is also possible to pro- duce a high temperature active reducing gas by produc- ing a plasma of carbon monoxide or transforming steam or carbon dioxide into a reducing gas (by decomposi- tion into hydrogen and carbon monoxide). Such a re- ducing gas is useful for the advanced reducing treat- ment of ores and molten metals. (2) Heat treatment of a fluid, such as fine powder, liquid and gas. ‘ The fluid to be heat treated is introduced through the axial bore 51 of the inner nozzle 115 into the bottom of the funnel-shaped arc 40e. The fluid may be dropped directly through the axial bore 51, or alternatively, a reactive gas may be used as a carrier. Heat treatment of a fluid according to this invention may be useful for a variety of applications, including the following: (a) Thermal cracking of pulverized coal or heavy oil to produce a high calorie gas; (b) Synthesis of a compound from powder of a metal and a gas (e.g., A1+§N2—A1N); (c) Reduction of metal oxides, such as Fe203, V05, NiO and A1203 to metals; and (d) Ultra-fine pulverizatiOn and spheroidizing treat- ment. According to the invention, the fluid to be treated can advantageously be fed into the center of a plasma to undergo most effective and uniform treatment. (3) High temperature slag refining of metal. A slag, such as CaO, is carried on an inert gas and introduced through the axial bore 51 of the inner nozzle 115. The slag is melted by a plasma into vapors and these vapors are injected into the metallic container of a smelting furnace. The plasma can easily heat the slag to a temperature above its melting point to facilitate active high temperature slag refining of metal. This invention is further advantageous in ensuring heating of all the slag introduced into the apparatus without allowing the torch to be adversely affected by the slag. (4) Surface treatment of metal or the like by spraying. The material with which an object is to be treated is ejected through the inner nozzle and sprayed on the surface of the object for the coating, padding or other surface treatment thereof. The plasma torch of this invention can, without being adversely affected in any way, heat all of the material to be sprayed, uniformly to an optimum temperature for any intended surface treat- ment. Thus, the present plasma torch provides a high yield of production by ensuring uniform surface treat- ment. FIG. 54 is a fragmentary representation of a modi- fied form of the magnetic field generator, specifically its magnetic coil. According to this embodiment, the mag- netic coil 34e is replaced with a magnetic coil 134 which is formed by cutting a spiral groove 125 on a portion of the main body 16e of the cathode Me. The coil 134 generates a magnetic field when fed with electric cur- rent. , As a further alternative to the construction of the magnetic field generator, the inner nozzle 115 itself may be formed from a permanent magnet, or a separate per- 7 manent magnet may be positioned in the vicinity of the inner nozzle 115. Further, a magnetic coil may be posi- tioned either inside or outside of the cathode 14e. Fur- thermore, the magnetic coil may be so positioned as to encircle the torch body 129. 5 Referring to FIGS. 6 through 8, there are shown a few examples of the plasma torch embodying this inven- tion which are designed for emitting an arc discharge in different directions. As can readily be seen from the drawing, the plasma torch 11f of FIG. 6 discharges an are through its annular opening 26f obliquely at an angle to the longitudinal axis of a torch body 12f. The plasma torch 11g of FIG. 7 discharges an are through its annular opening 26g outwardly obliquely. The plasma torch 11h of FIG. 8 dicharges an arc through its annular opening 26h horizontally outwardly in a direction en- tirely opposite to the direction of the arc discharge by the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1. FIGS. 9 and 10 are each a diagrammatic representa- tion of a modified circuit through which electric cur- 20 rent is supplied to the magnetic coil 34. In the circuit of FIG. 9, all of the electric current supplied across the cathode 14 and the material 43 to be heated is fed to the magnetic coil 34, while in the circuit of FIG. 10, electric current is supplied from the power source 46 to the coil 34 through a resistor 53. FIG. 11 shows a plasma torch 11i having a modified magnetic field generator 130. The magnetic field gener- ator 131‘ comprises a magnetic coil 341' and a magnetic core 55 formed from a magnetic material. The core 55 has an end 55a embedded in a nozzle element 15i to produce a magnetic field across an annular opening 261‘ in a direction indicated by an arrow Hi. The nozzle element 151’ may, if desired, be formed from a magnetic material to serve as a part (end 55a) of the core 55. FIGS. 12 through 15 illustrate several examples of modified circuits through which electric current is sup- plied to produce a plasma. In the circuit of FIG. 12, both of the cathode 14 and the nozzle elements 15 are electrically connected to the power source 46 directly. 40 FIG. 12 represents a modified electrical arrangement of the plasma torch of FIG. 1. FIG. 13 shows a modified electric circuit for the apparatus of FIG. 5—1, in which the cathode 14e is electrically connected to the negative terminal of the power source 46, and the outer nozzle 116 and the material 43 to be treated are connected to the positive terminal of the power source 46 through resistors 57 and 58, respectively. In FIG. 14 showing the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1, the cathode 14 is electri- cally connected to the negative terminal of the power 50 source 46 and the material 43 to be treated is connected to the positive terminal of the power source 46. A source of alternating current 59 is connected across the two nozzle elements 15. The electrical arrangement of FIG. 14 permits an are occurring between the cathode 55 14 and the material 43 to be superposed on an are dis- charged between the nozzle elements 15. FIG. 15 illus- trates an electrical arrangement for a pair of plasma torches 11 employed in combination. Each torch body 12 is electrically connected to the power source 46 in 60 the same manner as shown in FIG. 12. A source of alternating current 61 is connected across'the nozzle elements 15 of each torch 11. ' FIGS. 16 and 17 are each a further representation of the apparatus in which a plurality of plasma torches are 65 employed. In the apparatus of FIG. 16, a plasma torch 63 of the construction known in the art is disposed coaxially with a plasma torch 11f of the construction 10 15 25 30 35 45 4,275,287 8 shown in FIG. 6. The plasma torch 63 comprises a rod-shaped cathode 64 and a cylindrical nozzle 65 sur- rounding the cathode 64. A power source 67 (primarily of direct current) is connected between the cathode 64 and the material 43 to be treated. The cylindrical nozzle 65 defines a circular opening 66 which is coaxial with the annular opening 26f of the plasma torch 11f. The material 43 to be treated is so positioned that it is radi- ated simultaneously with both an are 40 discharged through the annular opening 26f of the plasma torch 11f and an are 68 discharged through the opening 66 of the plasma torch 63. In the apparatus of FIG. 17, a plasma torch 63 of the known construction shown in FIG. 16 is disposed coaxially with a plasma torch ll of the con- struction shown in FIG. 1. The power source 46 is connected between the cathode 14 of the plasma torch 11 and the cathode 64 of the plasma torch 63. The power source 67 is connected between the cathode 64 and the nozzle 65 of the plasma torch 63. Reference is now made to FIGS. 18 through 28 illus- trating a variety of applications for which the plasma torch embodying this invention may be advantageously employed. In the arrangement of FIG. 18, the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1 is employed to weld a pair of pipes 70 and 71 coaxially. In FIG. 19, the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1 is used to cut a bar 72. FIG. 20 shows an applica- tion in which the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1 is utilized to spray coating material on the material 43 to be treated. The coating material may be introduced, together with a gas being transformed into a plasma, through a pas- sage provided between the cathode 14 and the nozzle elements 15, or alternatively, it may be transported on a carrier gas through a passage pierced in the nozzle elements 15 in fluid communication with the annular opening 26 of the torch 11. A plasma may advanta- geously be formed from nitrogen or methane for nitrid- ing or carbonization of the surface of the material 43 to be treated. The application of FIG. 21 shows the plasma torch 11 of FIG. 1 which is used for hardening a roll 73. The roll 73 is heated by a plasma 40 during its movement through the plasma torch 11 in the direction of an arrow 74, followed by forced cooling with a splash of water 76 from a cooling device 75. FIG. 22 shows a plasma torch llj designed to discharge a plasma advancing in parallel to the longitudinal axis of the torch. The plasma torch llj is used for cutting a hole in a plate 77. FIG. 23 illustrates the application of the plasma torch 11f of FIG. 6 for melting a metal. A furnace body 80 constructed with refractory material in a well known manner contains the material 81 to be melted. An elec- trode 82 is provided at the bottom of the furnace body 80 to establish a supply of electric current to the mate- rial 81 to be melted. The plasma torch 11f is secured to a furnace roof 83 which is supported for vertical move- ment to and away from the furnace body 80. The fur- nace roof 83 is centrally provided with an opening 84 through which an alloy is thrown into the furnace body 80. The opening 84 is normally closed by a cover 85. According to the arrangement of FIG. 23, the plasma torch 11f having an annular opening at its outlet radiates a plasma jet over an enlarged surface area of the mate- rial 81 to be melted, thereby producing a remarkably advantageous effect of heating the material 81 quickly to a uniform temperature. Referring to FIG. 24, the plasma torch 11f of FIG. 6 is now used for remelting a bar 95. A remelting furnace 91 includes a crucible 92 constructed of copper in a well 9 known manner, and which is water V cooled. A. bar holder 94 is supported vertically movably in a well known manner and carries the bar 95 at its lower end. The plasma torch 11f emits a plasma jet 40 which melts the lower end of the bar 95, and the molten metal of the 5 A bar 95 drops into the crucible 92. The bar 95 is gradually lowered as its lower end is melted, and a bath. 96 of molten metal is built up in the crucible 92. The molten metal 96 solidifies as it is cooled in the water-cooled crucible 92, and the bottom 93 of the crucible 92 is gradually lowered as the bar 95 is melted, so that an ingot 97 into which the molten metal 96 has solidified is downwardly withdrawn. The crucible 92 is surrounded by a coil 98 for electrically heating or stirring the mol- ten metal 96 when necessary. The coil 98 may advanta- geously be substituted for the magnetic coil 34 if the coil 98 is designed for developing a magnetic field which may reach the annular opening 26f of the plasma torch 11f to cause rotation of the are 40 as hereinbefore de- scribed. FIG. 25 illustrates an application of this invention for reaction of particles. A reactor 100 is provided with a stack of coaxially disposed torch bodies 12 of the con- struction shown in FIG. 1, and also includes a plasma torch 63 of the type shown in FIG. 17 which is centered on the longitudinal axis of the stack of the torch bodies 12. A magnetic coil 101 surrounds the stack to develop a magnetic field across the annular opening 26 of each torch body 12. The reactor 100 has a plurality of inlet openings 102 through which the particles to be treated are introduced. The particles are heated by a plasma jet 40 emitted from each torch and undergo reaction. The reaction product 103 collects in the bottom of the reac- tor 100. Since each of the torches maintains an active region 42 of uniform temperature distribution across which a plasma jet prevails, all of the particles intro- duced into the reactor 100 are uniformly reacted, wher- ever they may drop through the reactor 100. This type of reactor may advantageously be used for the synthesis of a compound or the carcking of particles. Although it. is shown in FIG. 25 with a height extending along the entire height of the stack of the torch bodies 12, the magnetic coil 101 may alternatively be shortened in height and made mechanically movable for reciproca- tion along the longitudinal axis of the stack to create a magnetic field across the annular opening 26 of each torch. As a further alternative, the magnetic coil 101 may consist of a plurality of separate coil portions dis- posed one after another along the longitudinal axis of the torch bodies 12, and which may be electrically switched over to develop a magnetic field across the annular opening 26 of one torch after another. In FIG. 26, there is shown an apparatus in which gas ' is heated by a plurality of plasma torches. The apparatus includes a stack of three coaxially disposed plasma tor- ches 11k in a casing 104. Each plasma torch 11k is simi- lar in construction to the plasma torch 11 shown in FIG. 1, except that the two adjacent nozzle elements 15 of each adjoining pair of plasma torches 11 are com- bined into a signle nozzle element 15k of the unitary construction in the apparatus of FIG. 26. Gas is intro- duced into the casing 104 through its inlet opening 105, heated by plasma jets 40 to a high temperature, and discharged through an outlet opening 106. The appara- tus is also useful for the cracking of gas. FIG. 27 illustrates an application of this invention for a heat exchanger. This heat exchanger has a casing 107 provided with a stack of coaxially disposed plasma 4,275,287 10 15 20 25 30 35 45 50 55 65 10 torches 11k which is of the identical construction to those shoWn in FIG. 26..The heat exchanger includes a pipe 108 disposed on the longitudinal axis of the plasma torches 11k. Thepipe 108 is heated by the plasma jets createdby the torches 11k, and waste gases aredis- charged from the casing 107 through its outlet 111. The pipe 108 has an inlet opening 109 through which the fluid to be heated is introduced into the pipe 108. The fluid is heated while flowing through the pipe 108, and discharged through an outlet opening 110. FIG. 28 illustrates an apparatus employing a combi- nation of the plasma torch 11 shown in FIG. 1 and the plasma torch 11h of FIG. 8. The apparatus is used for simultaneously treating the inner and outer surfaces of a pipe 113 which is longitudinally movable relative to the plasma torches 11 and 11h. The specific application and operation of this inven- tion will further be described with reference to a couple of examples. (1) A plasma torch of the type shown in FIG. 1 was constructed by employing an electrode member 17 formed from tungsten containing 2% of thorium, and measuring 80 mm I.D., 110 mm OD. and 6 mm in thick- ness. The width of the annular opening 26 between the nozzle elements 15 was 6.9 mm. The magnetic coil 34 had 2,800 turns. Argon was introduced at the rate of 36 N liters per minute to form a plasma. A direct current of 0.7 A was supplied to the magnetic coil 34 to create a magnetic field and an arc was ignited in a well known manner, whereby a plasma jet was emitted against the material 43 to be treated having a diameter of 45 mm. The arc was found to be rapidly rotating in the form of a ring. The plasma showed an output of 300 A, 46 V. (2) The remelting furnace 91 of FIG. 24 was used for remelting a bar of heat resistant steel having a diameter of 30 mm. The steel bar was, at its lower end, heated and melted easily, rapidly and uniformly, whereby an ingot measuring 55 mm dia. by 500 mm long was ob- tained. A plasma of argon obtained by introducing argon at the rate of 68 N. m/min. showed an output of 500 A, 65 V. While it was, thus, possible to melt the steel bar at the rate of 1.20 kg/min., the speed of actual melting was limited to 0.77 kg/ min. in view of the delay in solidification of the molten metal. While the invention has been described with refer- ence to several preferred ~ forms and applications thereof, it will be understood that further modifications, variations or applications may be easily made by those skilled in the art of making and using a plasma torch without departing from the spirit and scope defined by the appended claims. What is claimed is: 1. A plasma torch comprising: (i) an annular cathode having an annular inner periph- eral portion with an edge face for discharge of a film-like plasma arc towards an axis of the cathode, (ii) a pair of annular nozzle elements disposed coaxi- ally with respect to said cathode and each situated at a spacing axially at a respective side of the cath- ode, each nozzle element including an inner periph- eral edge portion which extends beyond the inner peripheral edge face of the cathode in the directiOn towards said axis, a respective annular opening being defined between the inner peripheral edge portion of each nozzle element and the edge face of the cathode for discharge of gas towards the axis at each side of the arc, 4,275,287 11 (iii) a magnetic field generator for exerting a magnetic field on said arc to cause said are to rotate along said annular edge face of said cathode. 2. A plasma torch, as claimed in claim 1, wherein said annular inner peripheral portion of said cathode and said inner peripheral edge portions of said nozzles are relatively positioned and individually shaped such that the gas discharges from the respective openings are conically convergent towards said axis. 10 15 20 25 3O 35 45 50 55 65 12 3. A plasma torch, as claimed in claim 1, wherein one said nozzle element is disposed coaxially within the other said nozzle element, and wherein said magnetic field generator comprises a hollow cylindrical member of magnetic material for inducing a magnetic field, said member having one end disposed in the vicinity of said one nozzle element, and a magnetic coil surrounding said hollow cylindrical member. t i t t t UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT N0. : 4,275,287 DATED 3 June 23. 1981 INVENTOR(S) : Susumu Hiratake It is certified that error appears in the above—identified patent and that said Letters Patent is hereby corrected as shown below: On the Title Page, Item should read: -- (73) Asstgnee: Daidotokushuko Kabush‘lkikaisha, Japan --. Signed and Scaled this Twelfth D 3y or January 1982 lsuu Altai: GERALD J. MOSSINGHOFF Arresting Officer Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks ...
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US4275287 - 219*181 62/23/81 SR GR 452759237&amp;quot;...

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