07-Sheet Metal Forming

07-Sheet Metal Forming - CHAPTER 7 Sheet-Metal Forming...

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CHAPTER 7 Sheet-Metal Forming Processes Manufacturing Processes Prof. Tugrul Ozel
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Manufacturing Processes: Forming and Shaping chematic illustration of various sheet metal forming Manufacturing Processes Prof. Tugrul Ozel Schematic illustration of various sheet metal forming processes
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Sheet-Metal Forming Processes Process Characteristics Roll Forming Long parts with constant complex cross-sections; good surface finish; high production rates; high tooling costs. Stretch forming Large parts with shallow contours; suitable for low-quantity production; high labor costs; tooling and equipment costs depend on part size. Drawing Shallow or deep parts with relatively simple shapes; high production rates; high tooling and equipment costs. Stamping Includes a variety of operations, such as punching, blanking, embossing, bending, flanging, and coining; simple or complex shapes formed at high production rates; tooling and equipment costs can be high, but labor cost is w. low. Rubber forming Drawing and embossing of simple or complex shapes; sheet surface protected by rubber membranes; flexibility of operation; low tooling costs. Spinning Small or large axisymmetric parts; good surface finish; low tooling costs, but labor costs can be high unless operations are automated. Superplastic rming Complex shapes, fine detail and close tolerances; forming times are long, ence production rates are low; parts not suitable for high mperature use forming hence production rates are low; parts not suitable for high-temperature use. Peen forming Shallow contours on large sheets; flexibility of operation; equipment costs can be high; process is also used for straightening parts. Explosive forming Very large sheets with relatively complex shapes, although usually axisymmetric; low tooling costs, but high labor costs; suitable for low- quantity production; long cycle times. Magnetic-pulse forming Shallow forming, bulging, and embossing operations on relatively low- strength sheets; most suitable for tubular shapes; high production rates; requires special tooling. Manufacturing Processes Prof. Tugrul Ozel TABLE 7.1 General characteristics of sheet-metal forming proceses.
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Sheet Metal Forming Characteristics a) Yield-point elongation: Low-carbon steels exhibit a behavior called yield-point elongation due to plastic instability takes place until entire material reaches to plastic deformation b) Anisotropy: (or directionality) crystallographic anisotropy (from preffered grain orientation) and mechanical fibering (from alignment of impurities, inclusions, voids etc) c) Grain size: grain size affects the mechanical properties and large grain size results in rougher surfaces after forming. d) Residual stresses: residual stresses can develop in sheet-metal parts ecause of the non niform deformation that the sheet undergoes during because of the non-uniform deformation that the sheet undergoes during forming.
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This note was uploaded on 09/20/2011 for the course ENG 303 taught by Professor Any during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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07-Sheet Metal Forming - CHAPTER 7 Sheet-Metal Forming...

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