(Ebook) 14 Ways to Get Breakthrough Ideas

(Ebook) 14 Ways to Get Breakthrough Ideas - Info 1/17 14...

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Unformatted text preview: Info 1/17 14 Ways to Get Breakthrough Ideas Mitch Ditkoff Info 2/17 There’s a lot of talk these days—especially in busi- ness circles—about the importance of innovation. All CEOs worth their low salt lunch want it. And they want it, of course, now. Innovation, they rea- son, is the competitive edge. What sparks innovation? People. What sparks people? Inspired ideas that meet a need—whether expressed or unexpressed—ideas with enough mojo to rally sustained support. Is there anything a person can do—beyond caffeine, corporate pep talks, or astrology readings—to quicken the appearance of breakthrough ideas? Yes, there is. And it begins with the awareness of where ideas come from in the first place. There are two schools of thought on this subject. The first school ascribes the origin of ideas to in- spired individuals who, through a series of pur- poseful mental processes, conjure up the new and the different—cerebral shamen, if you will. The second school of thought ascribes the appearance of ideas to a transcendent force, a.k.a. the “Collective Unconscious,” the “Platonic Realm,” the “Muse” or the “Mind of God.” According to this perspective, ideas are not created, but already exist, becoming accessible only to those human beings who have sufficiently tuned themselves to receive them. The first approach is considered Western, with a strong bias towards thinking and is best summa- rized by Rene Descartes’ “I think therefore I am” maxim. Most business people subscribe to this ap- proach. The second approach is usually considered Eastern, with a strong bias towards feeling, and is best summarized by the opposite of the Cartesian view: “I am, therefore I think.” Most artists and “creative types” are associated with this approach, with its focus on intuitive knowing. Both approaches are valid. Both are effective. Both are used at different times by all of us, depending on our mood, circumstances, and conditioning. What does all of this have to do with you, oh aspir- ing innovator? Plenty, since you are most likely a hybrid of the above-mentioned schools of thought. That’s what this Manifesto is all about—a quick hitting tutorial of what you can do to conjure up brilliant ideas. The only tuition required is your attention and a willingness to try something new. J “Why is it I always get my best ideas while shaving?” Albert Einstein Info 3/17 1. FOLLOW YOUR FASCINATION If you find yourself fascinated by a new idea, chances are good that there’s something meaningful about it for you to consider. Fascination, quite simply, is nature’s way of getting our attention. Well beyond seduction or attraction, it’s an indication that we are being called . Out of the thousands of ideas with the power to capture our imagination, the fascination felt for one of them is a clue that there’s something worthy of our engagement....
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(Ebook) 14 Ways to Get Breakthrough Ideas - Info 1/17 14...

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