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MyChapter1 - WebDevelopment&Design Lecture Notes on Chapter...

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1 Web Development & Design  Foundations with XHTML Lecture Notes on Chapter 1. Note: This slide file has been prepared using the author’s original slide file on Chapter 1. However, I have inserted many of my own notes in this file. My notes are usually in a different colors. MyChapter1.ppt
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2 Learning  Outcomes In this chapter, you will learn about: The evolution of the Internet, Internet  standards organizations, and the difference  between the Internet, intranets, and  extranets. The beginning of the World Wide Web,  ethical use of information on the Web, Web  Accessibility, and future Internet trends. The Client/Server Model, Internet  Protocols, Networks, URLs and Domain  Names, and Markup Languages.  MyChapter1.ppt
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3 Client Computer: Internet Browser like IE or Netscape Web Server (machine) and Web Server Software IIS, Apache, Websphere or Weblogic Servers Request: (for a Web document via an HTTP packet) Response: (an HTTP packet containing the requested document) The Client Server Relationship for the Internet Try an Australian Web Page: http://www.tga.health.gov.au/about/tga.htm
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4 1.1 (Ahmed): Introduction: At the most elementary level, a Web server stores various HTML/XHTML/XML/css documents (i.e. physical files) in its disk. When a user’s browser requests a document, the server finds the document (i.e., the file) and delivers the requested HTML document to the user’s browsers. These documents are nothing but text files containing special mark-up codes, and the usual file extensions of most of these files are *.html , or *.htm. After the user’s browser receives a marked-up document, it processes the document and then displays the contents of the marked-up document on the user’s computer’s screen as a “Web Page”. In this particular case, the actual processing of the marked-up document is done by the user’s browser at the user’s machine. Thus, this type of web pages are often called “ Client-Side Web Pages ”. MyChapter1.ppt
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5 A user enters an URL (Uniform Resource Locator), such as: http://www.maconstateit.net/tutorials/XHTML/default.htm into his/her browser, and presses the Enter/Return key. The browser sends the request across the Internet to the Web Server that hosts the file. In our example, the host would be http://www.maconstateit.net . This host is presumed to have a file named default.htm in its /tutorials/XHTML subfolder of its home site. When the server receives the request, it searches and locates requested file in its disk’s homesite/tutorial/XHTML folder. The server sends the requested file to user’s browser that initiated the request When the browser receives the requested file, it processes the mark-up’s of the received document (i.e. file) and displays its contents on the client computer’s monitor.
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