Lecture 31 - Maxwell's equations. EM waves

Lecture 31 - Maxwell's equations. EM waves - Maxwells...

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1 Lecture 31 Maxwell’s equations Maxwell s equations. Electromagnetic waves. Maxwell’s equations 0 q EdA  Gauss’s law for E 0 BdA Gauss’s law for B d Edl dt Faraday’s law 00 Bdl I     Ampere’s law In the absence of sources 0 0 The symmetry is then very impressive: changing -field induces -field changing -field induces -field produces , produces Example: At some point P in space, the measured electric field as a function of time is: P t This field MUST be accompanied by a field. But if the induced field also changes with time, it induces an field! This can be self-sustained ! “Perturbation” ( or field) propagates in space wave Very special wave, can propagate in vacuum: no medium !
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2 Electromagnetic waves Let us assume that we have: E -field in the y direction, uniform along yz plane B -field in the z direction, uniform along plane • propagation in the x direction Plane electromagnetic wave y z and are the same at all points in this plane, but different at a parallel plane further down the axis.
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course PHYS 222 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '07 term at Iowa State.

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Lecture 31 - Maxwell's equations. EM waves - Maxwells...

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