LectureNotes_QualitativeResearch

LectureNotes_QualitativeResearch - Lecture 6 Qualitative...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 6 Qualitative Research Definition - any kind of research that produces findings not arrived at by means of statistical procedures or other means of quantification Quantitative Qualitative Causal determination Interested in how a phenomenon is occurring. For instance, in marketing you could generalize the buyer behavior of a demographic or segment of the population. Illumination Interested understanding the motivation or decision making of the individual (insights into why). For example, a particular group may have a preference for a product. Marketers could interview individuals and gauge the reasons for their preference. Prediction Interested in repetition of a phenomena. Can you make assumptions about a population? In marketing, populations exhibit preferences for certain types of products. When companies develop new products, they will do so with a general understanding of the preferences of their target market. Understanding Qualitative research is not interested in repetition. Instead, each individual occurrence is unique. A good qualitative researcher will try to understand the thought processes of each individual in order to gain a larger perspective. In marketing, preferences are specific to the individual. Generalization of Findings Interested in making assumptions about a population. For instance, 42% of women survey demonstrated a preference for the color pink. Extrapolation to similar situations Instead of generalizing, qualitative researcher compares the thoughts and feelings of the individual in order to gain specific insights into each unique instance of a phenomenon. For example, a research might ask a respondent about their favorite color. They might ask additional questions about how the color makes them feel. One respondent might say that they love pink, because it reminds them of their mother or childhood. These are insights that cannot be gained with quantitative research....
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2011 for the course BUSX 301 taught by Professor Case during the Spring '08 term at Towson.

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LectureNotes_QualitativeResearch - Lecture 6 Qualitative...

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